New book explores love, death, religion and rape in South Asia

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A UNIQUE new book is set to take South Asia by storm as it addresses burning issues such as love, death, rape and religion in the developing sub-continent.

Divided by partition, war and politics, but united by creativity and common humanity, Asian Voices has brought together 20 emerging writers from across the region to shine a light on their diverse societies.

In 37,000 words, across 260 pages, the contributors paint graphic pictures in poetry and prose of issues which divide and unite people in their respective countries of India, Pakistan and Afghanistan.

The book is divided into 10 sections: Darkness, Light, Love, Loss, Heaven, Hell, Life, Death, War and Peace.

And it is within these sections that the diverse Asian Voices can be heard.

With an infant mortality rate of 4.4% in India and 6.1% in Pakistan (the UK rate is 0.28%) and an adult death rate of 31% and 21% respectively (UK rate 10.3%) – an even higher rate in war-torn Afghanistan – it is hardly surprising that the issue of death features strongly.

Mortality is dealt with sensitively by the Asian Voices writers in at least three sections of the book.

This extract on coping with grief by Lahore based writer Shahreen Iftikhar is an example:

“They say, there are five stages of grief;

I got stuck in denial, with no reasons to heal.

Is this what life is; scribbles on an empty sheet?

Making no sense, just filling the voids of our being?

I said to myself: ‘To Hell with all this grieving and the misery.

It’s time for me to let go of all the tragedies.’

All I had to do was believe.

That is all it took for me to heal.”

 

All countries in South Asia live under different degrees of social patriarchy and this is reflected in the treatment of women.

Rape is the third most common crime against women in India.

According to the National Crime Records Bureau 2013 annual report, 24,923 rape cases were reported across India in 2012. Out of these, 24,470 (98%) were committed by someone known to the victim. And many more rapes go unreported.

Similarly, physical abuse, house-arrest imprisonment and even bride-burning (now illegal) also go largely unreported.

One of the Asian Voices writers, Janvi from Jaipur has already made a name for herself in calling out for social reform.

This extract speaks volumes:

And then one day we decide to raise our voice 

But again, this society shut us by claiming it as useless noise.

The politicians and the media cry that they worship women and cow!

Is this a way of worshipping? But How?

As our wails grow louder and louder about the demons residing in our own town 

They paint henna on our hands and send us off to an unknown place, looking like a clown.

Wondering that this was not the life that we were destined to live, we decide to put an end

And here you go, creating loads of new monsters and making it Trend.

We are sacrificing ourselves from centuries just so that you know

And here you go, treating us again like the trash that you throw. 

We’ve had enough, being the sacrificed Goddess 

Next time we’ll turn this country into a bloody mess.

 

Religion also resonates within the pages of the book.

India is home to at least nine recognised religions, and while Islam dominates in Pakistan, there are also significant minorities of Christians, Hindus and Ahmadi, and even more diversity in Afghanistan.

So the sections on Life, Heaven and Hell deal with each writer’s views of spirituality and faith.

This piece by 16-year-old Shaheeba from Sibsagar touches many pulses:

How could she survive further?

When her life resided in this heart rate.

Though not here, but in Heaven

They merged to a single soul

Whenever their love tale was evoked

It started raining

Dripping all with pure love.

This flooded the river of love

Which immersed both the fragments of the hamlet

With the virtue of love.

There was love everywhere

Flowing in the winds of hamlet

Residing in the lifeless soil

Felt in the arms of the mother

And in the oneness with God.

Some souls are united in Heaven.

Some stories are plenary despite being partial.

 

The one thing which binds all the writers together is the eternal subject of Love.

For centuries the Indian sub-continent has given birth to some of the world’s greatest love poets. And they continue to emerge as we enter 2019.

This poem by Agathaa Shelling of Ahmedabad, explores that deepest of all human emotions:

You’re the sanctified sacrament in the shrine of love. I’ll devour you and I’ll become pious forever.

Yes, I’m an atheist and there’s only one religion that I practise. That’s love. And there’s only one deity from whom I receive my hymn… it’s you.

And if this is not love. I don’t know what it is. A little bit of fall in your summer. A little bit of rains in your spring. Sunshine in your winters. And a chilly gust of wind in scorching heat.

“There was once a king of verses. Power were his words. Mightier than any sword. And then there was a queen of metaphors. Deep were her rhymes. Deeper than any ocean.

He weaved a tiara out of his words and she sharpened his sword out of hers.

And that’s how they announced their love, with poetry.”

 

Minnie Rai, a writer and 26-year-old refugee from Kabul, who now lives in London, sums up the ethos of Asian Voices: “We don’t become by knowing… we become by doing.

“It is in the present we live and share diversity from within outwards. Through love and death we learn the language of war within us that separates us from the truth that sits beside our heart. When we share that truth, we become one… Asian Voices,” she adds.

 

  • Asian Voices will be published in both paperback and Kindle e-book in February.

 

Printer’s Ink, Dreams of Dylan and the Road Home

POTY BLOG

REVIEW OF THE YEAR 2018

The world is old
The world is grey
Lessons of life
Can’t be learned in a day

It’s the last day’s last hour
Of the last happy year
I feel the unknown
In this world is so dear

AS the clock ticks towards midnight on the last day of the year, I pull some ragged guitar strings to sharpen my senses and recall the time retreating.

This year has been unlike any other… a curate’s egg of good, bad, poisonous and beautiful. But while crows’ feet and grey lines etch the passage of my life line, 2018 is a year I will never forget.

  • Four remarkable holidays in Dorset (twice), Northumberland and Argyll – where I buried my heart many lifetimes ago.
  • A prostate cancer scare, which turned into something more insidious, but far more treatable.
  • The hottest UK summer in 40 years.
  • The death of two amazing musical friends.
  • The publication of five books – yes FIVE!
  • Featured in the book Dreaming of Dylan alongside my hero Patti Smith.
  • Watching my son grow into a fine young man.
  • The redemption of spirit with a family of writers some 5,000 miles away.

But, any review of the year, has to be about the people who made it unique and so very special.

So stay with me as this will be an OCD review on turbo charge, month by month…

 

JANUARY

I first met Saumyata Bisht in late November 2017 – a spirited and budding young writer from the foothills of the Himalayas in India.

I spent the next six weeks editing her first novel… the astounding Gauri: A Sin Between My Legs, which was published worldwide on 10 January this year.

We spoke daily – sometimes three or four times a day via video calls. We became exceptionally close friends and by the end of January began compiling an anthology of global poetry and made plans for at least three more books. By the end of March we were literary friends for life.

But a moment of madness in early April terminated that friendship – something I will always regret.

She remains, in my view, the most original writer I have come across in more than 20 years, and a beautiful soul.

 

FEBRUARY

Caroline Outterside is a second cousin who has many closer family links with me. Her husband is the son of Billy Outterside, my father’s first cousin, who grew up alongside him, attended each other’s weddings and remained close for more than 60 years.

Caroline is a joyous and astute counselling psychologist, but more than that a wondrous mum to three adult children and a dear friend.

But 12 months ago her world was turned upside down when she was diagnosed with a malignant cancer of the tongue and tonsils.

Her bravery during surgery and radiation treatment from February onwards is a testament to her spirit and the love of those around her.

She is an inspiration and a true hero.

 

MARCH

John Leach has been a friend for more than 10 years.

We were colleagues together at NWM Media and although I was a journalist and he in Credit Control our friendship grew closer after we had both left that part of our working life.

We share a similar passion for football, rock music and corny humour, which ensures a bond.

We are also both dads of amazing kids… but John is a super dad: a foster parent to more lucky children than I can count.

He is also someone who has always been there for me, even when my life is at its darkest, offering friendship, succor and even a roof over my head if ever needed.

John could have been any month of the year, but I chose March, because he encompasses the Spring Equinox of my year.

 

APRIL

I first met Komal Arshad in January 2014.

She is a young doctor, currently finishing her studies at a medical college in northern Pakistan.

She hopes to train to become a cardiologist here in the UK.

We met through our shared passion for the liberation of Palestine and have remained close ever since.

She may live 4,000 miles away, but she could equally live next door.

Our friendship is close and over the past few years barely a week goes by without contact either by text, email or video call.

I am often the first person she has turned to with everyday problems such as arguments with her university room-mate, worries about marriage and the aftermath of a house fire in April this year, from which she and her mother miraculously escaped with their lives.

Komal is my surrogate daughter and she lovingly regards me as her second father… for that I am so full of gratitude.

This year was made so special when she said she wanted me and my family to attend her wedding… with the proviso: “I need to find a husband first!”

 

MAY

I first met Annabel James in 2017 as a fellow poet on social media.

Articulate, intelligent, beautiful and musical, this spirit from Tulsa, Oklahoma quickly became a great friend and was the first recruit to my poetry anthology Different Voices. When that book was hijacked by others upon publication, she was one of the first to rally round a new project we called Luminance in May this year.

Annabel was a driving force for Luminance and even recruited a new writer from Kentucky to help the project achieve true greatness. Her unswerving loyalty and friendship will be rewarded with a first paperback copy of the book in February 2019.

Through my own health problems and further writing during this year, she has remained a lovely and true friend across the breadth of the Atlantic and time divides.

 

JUNE

Kirsty Scott and I were newspaper colleagues in Scotland some 24 years ago.

While I reveled in hard news, Kirsty was growing into one of the finest feature writers and novelists I have ever known. The last time I saw her to speak to was in an Asda supermarket in Perth in 1995, while she was carrying her first child. We wished each other well before the ensuing years our lives and careers took different tracks.

I caught up with Kirsty about three years ago through the wonders of Facebook and Instagram and we both swapped news about our respective lives and those of our children.

But I was rocked when I discovered in 2017 that she was battling breast cancer. Her battle throughout that year and into 2018, involving surgery and courses of chemotherapy, was relentless. But Kirsty maintained her humour and indomitable spirit, keeping everyone in her circle of trust and friendship with light and laughter.

She is a true beacon and one of my heroes of the year.

 

JULY

Sometimes in life you meet someone who you know instantly was carved from a different rock than the rest of us.

Vonny Tuzio is one such person. I have known Von for more than 10 years. Football and rugby crazy, she is also a besotted lover of pugs, cats and all animals. She is also the most generous person I have ever known. Besides writing Christmas cards which I will never throw away, she has also showered us with many remarkable gifts, each sealed with genuine love and affection.

So when she turned up at our back door in July, laden down with beer, cheese, plants, chocolates and pickles plus two of her adorable pugs it was like having a second Christmas.

Vonny stayed for four days, enough to swill a lot of beer and wine and cheer on England in two World Cup games.

In years to come when asked about July 2018, I will recall two people: Harry Kane and Vonny Tuzio!

 

AUGUST

My younger son Nathan Outterside has been the apple of my eye from the day he was born at 4lbs 10oz on Christmas Eve 2001.

Sadly my marriage to his mother broke down when he was only three-years-old and he came to live with me 24/7 after he had just turned four. For the next nine years, as his single parent, Nathan was my sole focus in life… teaching him to read, taking and fetching him from school, endless trips to taekwondo classes and tournaments, playing, supporting and everything else any parent does for their child.

Sometimes it was hard work, but the rewards have been many, including him gaining his black belt in taekwondo in 2016.

But the biggest reward and an enormous moment of personal pride was in August when he achieved nine GCSEs all at the top A grade.

Now he is studying for his A Levels with a focus to become an engineer.

He really is my new clear star!

 

SEPTEMBER

This was the month when I kicked off my latest book project: Asian Voices – an anthology of poetry, prose, letters, essays and drawings from a team of 20 incredibly talented emerging writers from Pakistan, Afghanistan and India.

The fact that this team has, in four months, become a family of close friends and embedded souls is a testament to the lyrical journey we are all still carving.

So I salute and embrace you all: Minnie Rai, Agathaa Shelling, Nicky Das, Anshul, Anjali Kumari, Elly, Janvi, Fahmida Shaikh, Shaheeba, Sakshi Walia, Shiraz, Pratik, Alankrita Singh, Sobia, Sanya, Aditya, Shilpa Goel, Shahreen Inftikhar, Pratibha Aasat and our cover girl Jasleen Kaur.

 

OCTOBER

Ian Hine and I have been good friends for the past 15 years through our shared love of Brighton and Hove Albion FC, our passion for music and the quiet joys of parenthood.

We also lived in a similar part of Sussex as teenagers and bonded as adults with our Fans United campaign to save Wrexham FC from its asset-stripping owners.

But much more than that, Ian has been a confidante and close friend through all of life’s troubles, and though he lives 160 miles away he is one of the first people to offer support when I am struggling.

And as a collector of umpteen million football programmes, he is also an amazing literary and football fount of knowledge.

So when in October I decided to write my current book Death in Grimsby (my decades of following Brighton and Hove Albion)… Ian was the first person I turned to for advice and historical facts.

And as always, within a few minutes he came up trumps, and offered ongoing support.

 

NOVEMBER

Sometimes people just fall into your path and you stand star-struck at their talent and personality.

So it was on a grey November day when I first came across movie starlet Priyanka Singh.

Priyanka, from Kolkata in India is the close friend of one of my Asian Voices’ writers ALankrita, and the first time I saw her was her beautiful spoken rendition of one of ALan’s poems.

As a refugee from Drama courses, both at first degree and postgraduate studies, I seem to have surrounded myself with thesps all my life. I am humbled that three great friends are professionally trained and accomplished movie actors.

Priyanka has no such formal training, yet her acting and miming across dozens of TikTok videos will entrance and delight the most hardened soul.

Behind her masquerade she is a beautiful, reserved and gentle soul… and has begun to teach me Hindi!

 

DECEMBER

In my life I have cried far too many tears of sorrow and loss that I have drowned happiness.

But twice in December I shed tears of pure joy.

One occasion was when I opened my Christmas present from my son Nathan. It was not the amazing gift of a pair of Levi 501s that made me cry, but his beautiful words written on the wrapping paper which will stay with until I die.

The second occasion occurred a week earlier when one of my treasured writers of Asian Voices asked if I would be her adopted father.

Knowing of the loss of my own daughters, the amazing Nicky Das (who ironically is the same age as my youngest daughter Shannon) simply asked me to be her dad and to promise to fly to Jodhpur in India for her wedding and then to “dance with me like fathers do with their daughters”.

The tears of joy and love flowed freely on both occasions.

What a way to end 2018!

 

Unique book unites 20 writers from Pakistan India and Afghanistan

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DIVIDED by partition, war and politics, but united by creativity, brilliance and common humanity, a unique new book has brought together 20 emerging writers from across South Asia to shine a light on their diverse societies.

In 37,000 words, across 260 pages and two dozen images, these contributors paint graphic pictures of love, beauty, loss, poverty, patriarchy, disease and murder in their respective countries of India, Pakistan and Afghanistan.

From Kabul in the north, through Lahore and Delhi, to Hyderabad in the south, their tales in poetry and prose are compelling.

The writers include an artistic director from Lahore, an electronic engineer from Mumbai, a psychologist from Delhi, a social reformer from Jaipur, two 12th grade school students, plus many more.

The project has been pulled together by a retired British newspaper editor.

Most of the writers have, until now, only seen their work published on social media or in short order paperbacks.

Now, ASIAN VOICES is providing a professionally produced anthology of their work, for worldwide publication in February 2019.

This “family” of contributors live and work up to 5,000 miles apart, across six time zones, and their writings display the diversity of their home cities and cultures to form the unique nature of the book.

The works include letters of longing, narrative poems about grief, essays on abuse, patriarchy, rape and murder, a story about cancer and bereavement as well as countless poems of love, loss, discovery, anger, lust, peace and war.

“We don’t become by knowing… we become by doing,” says Minnie Rai, a writer and 26-year-old refugee from Kabul, who now lives in London.

“It is in the present we live and share diversity from within outwards. Through love and death we learn the language of war within us that separates us from the truth that sits beside our heart.

“When we share that truth, we become one… Asian Voices,” she adds.

Mum, wife and teacher Sobia Shakir from Karachi in Pakistan, poignantly adds: “In art lies, the soul of an artist.”

Fellow writer and interior designer Pratibha Aasat from Hyderabad in southern India says: “All our words are powerful emotions expressing varied feelings, the silent whispers of hearts, connecting every soul and thoughts, so vivid that they represent a complete lived life… to last in the memoirs forever.”

Retired newspaper and magazine editor Nic Outterside from Wolverhampton, England is the editor and publisher of ASIAN VOICES.

“I have edited many publications over the years,” says Nic, “But none has been as challenging and exciting as this.

“I am very lucky to have so many amazingly talented and beautiful people contributing to this hugely diverse project.

“Their writing alone is breath-taking, but it doesn’t stop there… they are all brimming with ideas about the book. Their excitement is palpable and their talent immense.”

Stay tuned for more news about ASIAN VOICES in the run-up to publication in both paperback and on Kindle in the week ending 17 February 2019.

New book brings together 20 writers from India, Pakistan and Afghanistan

BLOG AV COVER

A UNIQUE new book has brought together 20 emerging writers from across South Asia to shine a light on their diverse societies.

In over 35,000 words and two dozen images these contributors paint graphic images of love, beauty, loss, poverty, patriarchy, disease and murder in their respective countries of India, Pakistan and Afghanistan.

From Kabul in the north, through Lahore and Delhi, to Hyderabad in the south, their tales in poetry and prose are compelling.

The writers include a Muslim teacher and mum from Karachi, a 26-year-old refugee from Kabul, an electronic engineer from Mumbai, a psychologist from Delhi, a social reformer from Jaipur, two 12th grade school students, plus many more.

The project has been pulled together by a retired British newspaper editor.

Most of the writers have, until now, only seen their work published on social media or in short order paperbacks.

Now, ASIAN VOICES is providing a professionally produced anthology of their work, for worldwide publication in February 2019.

This “family” of contributors live and work up to 6,000 miles apart, across six time zones, and their writings display the diversity of their home cities and cultures to form the unique nature of the book.

The works include letters of longing, narrative poems about grief, essays on abuse, patriarchy, rape and murder, a story about cancer and bereavement as well as countless poems of love, loss, discovery, anger, lust, peace and war.

“As individuals we are all so very different; different cultures, ages, nationalities and genders, but as writers we have been able to form an incredible bond that reflects the many ways that, as humans we have common needs, hopes, dreams and hearts,” says Fahmida Shaikh, an oceanographer from Bhiwandi.

Sakshi Walia, an English Literature student from Amity University in New Delhi says: “Together, I believe our words are shining a blinding light on the reality of being human, in a world of seeming chaos.”

Fellow English Lit student Anjali Kumari at Delhi University, added: “Everything, whether living or dead has a story to tell, everyone is a muse to someone.”

Retired newspaper and magazine editor Nic Outterside from Wolverhampton, England is the editor and publisher of ASIAN VOICES.

“I have edited many publications over the years,” says Nic, “But none has been as challenging and exciting as this.

“I am so lucky to have so many amazingly talented and beautiful people contributing to this hugely diverse project.

“Their writing alone is breath-taking, but it doesn’t stop there… they are all brimming with ideas about the book. Their excitement is palpable and their talent immense.”

Stay tuned for more news about ASIAN VOICES in the run-up to publication in both paperback and on Kindle in the week ending 17 February 2019.

Poetic homage to the greatest LP of all time published by award-winning writer

BLOOD BLOG

AN award-winning writer and editor has published his life-long labour of love as a homage to his muse, American Nobel prize-winning songwriter Bob Dylan.

The book, Blood in the Cracks, tips its hat both lyrically and in style to Dylan’s critically acclaimed “greatest album” Blood on the Tracks – originally released in 1974.

Nic Outterside is a multi-award-winning journalist and creative author, who over 32 years has worked across all forms of media, including magazines, weekly and daily newspapers, radio broadcasting, books and online.

In 1994, 43 MPs signed an Early Day Motion in the British House of Commons praising Nic’s research and writing.

In 2016 he was awarded an honorary doctorate in written journalism.

Now, after publishing two widely acclaimed books of his own poetry, and editing other poets’ work, Nic is at last releasing what he describes as his “labour of loveBlood in the Cracks.

“The works of Bob Dylan are the soundtrack to my life,” says Nic.

“It is now 45 years since I first came to his music, his words of truthful vengeance and his vignettes of love and theft.

“One particular album, Blood on the Tracks, remains a lyrical and poetic touchstone.

“My soul is forever wrapped within the songs of its entire 51 minutes and 42 seconds.

“Overtly autobiographical, the LP is full of tales of a lover relating a series of unrelated events set in a mythical America. Like a series of impressionist paintings of life itself, the tales are both timeless and without geographical boundaries.

“Over 10 iconic songs, Dylan alludes to heartache, deception, anger, poignant regret and loneliness.

“It’s a world-weary, nostalgic and ultimately a poetic Bob Dylan; and that is what makes Blood on the Tracks so timeless.

“The poetry is in each and every song,” adds Nic.

“So to create my own poetical homage to that album – in places borrowing the patterns of some of Dylan’s songs – is a labour of love and a dream come true.”

 

Notes:

  1. Nic is an award-winning editor, journalist and writer. Among more than a dozen awards to his name are North of England Daily Journalist of the Year, Scottish Daily Journalist of the Year, Scottish Weekly Journalist of the Year and a special national award for investigative journalism. In 2016 he was awarded an honorary doctorate in written journalism.
  2. Blood in the Cracks is available world-wide on Amazon Kindle: www.amazon.co.uk/Blood-Cracks-Nic-Outterside-ebook/dp/B07H4S3DSM
  3. A paperback version of the book will be published this autumn
  4. The full story behind his first book of poetry can be listened to here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=o2N2X7t7awo
  5. You can buy The Hill – Songs and Poems of Darkness and Light on Amazon Kindle, priced just £1.43 at: www.amazon.co.uk/Hill-Songs-Poems-Darkness-Light-ebook/dp/B07CNZ75MZ
  6. You can still buy the First Edition paperback (120 copies left of the print run of 1,000) The Hill – Songs and Poems of Darkness and Light in paperback, is priced at just £1.99 with £1.80 for UK post and packing Ebay: https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/The-Hill-Songs-and-Poems-of-Darkness-and-Light-Nic-Outterside-Paperback/222959978770?hash=item33e9734912:g:3O0AAOSwdjha6DvY
  7. Nic’s second poetry book: Another Hill – Songs and Poems of Love and Theft is priced at £2.20 on Amazon Kindle at: www.amazon.co.uk/Another-Hill-Songs-Poems-Theft-ebook/dp/B07CXYJTV4/

 

The UK and US torture and rendition cover-up

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TODAY’S Guardian newspaper shines a mainstream media spotlight on the true scale of the UK’s role in the rendition and torture of many innocent suspects following the 9/11 atrocities in 2001.

Two Government reports, published today, 28 June 2018, reveal British intelligence’s treatment of terrorism suspects.

The reports by the parliamentary intelligence and security committee amount to one of the most damning indictments ever of UK intelligence, revealing links to torture and rendition were much more widespread than previously reported.

While there was no evidence of officers directly carrying out physical mistreatment of detainees, the reports say the overseas agency MI6 and the domestic service MI5 were involved in hundreds of torture cases and scores of rendition cases.

The reports were published despite the US government demanding last-minute changes.

The reports say the British secret service agencies were aware “at an early point” of the mistreatment of detainees by the US and others.

There were two cases in which UK personnel were “party to mistreatment administered by others”.

One has been investigated by the Metropolitan police but the other is still to be fully investigated.

The report dealing with the treatment of detainees details a litany of cases of concern, saying: “We have found 13 incidents where UK personnel witnessed at first hand a detainee being mistreated by others, 25 where UK personnel were told by detainees that they had been mistreated by others and 128 incidents recorded where agency officers were told by foreign liaison services about instances of mistreatment. In some cases, these were correctly investigated but this was not consistent.”

It said that in 232 cases UK personnel continued to supply questions or intelligence to other services despite knowledge or suspicion of mistreatment, as well as “198 cases where UK personnel received intelligence from liaison services which had been obtained from detainees who knew they had been mistreated – or with no indication as to how the detainee had been treated but where we consider they should have suspected mistreatment.”

The committee found three individual cases where MI6 or MI5 made or offered to make a financial contribution to others to conduct a rendition operation.

In 28 cases, the agencies either suggested, planned or agreed to rendition operations proposed by others.

In a further 22 cases, MI6 or MI5 provided intelligence to enable a rendition operation to take place. In 23 cases they failed to take action to prevent rendition.

The report says those at headquarters were aware of reports of mistreatment by the US – including 38 cases in 2002 alone – but did not take them seriously.

“That the US, and others, were mistreating detainees is beyond doubt, as is the fact that the agencies and defence intelligence were aware of this at an early point,” the report says.

“The same is true of rendition: there was no attempt to identify the risks involved and formulate the UK’s response. There was no understanding in HMG of rendition and no clear policy – or even recognition of the need for one.”

The reports shine a bright light publicly on the horrendous actions of the British secret services and their US allies.

Many researchers and human rights campaigners have tried to expose these extraordinary rendition processes for many years.

After the attacks against the United States of 11 September 2001, the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) conspired with dozens of governments to build a secret extraordinary rendition and detention programme that spanned the globe. Extraordinary rendition is the transfer—without legal process—of a detainee to the custody of a foreign government for purposes of detention and interrogation.

The programme, started under President George W Bush was intended to “protect America”.

But, instead it stripped people of their most basic rights, facilitated gruesome forms of torture, at times captured the wrong people, and debased the United States’ human rights reputation world-wide.

Until today, the United States and the vast majority of the other governments involved – more than 50 in all – have refused to acknowledge their participation, compensate the victims, or hold accountable those most responsible for the programme and its abuses.

Torture 4

Here are 20 additional facts that expose just how brutal and mistaken the programme was:

  1. At least 136 individuals were extraordinarily rendered or secretly detained by the CIA and at least 54 governments reportedly participated in the CIA’s secret detention and extraordinary rendition programme.
  2. A series of US Department of Justice memoranda authorized torture methods that the CIA applied on detainees. The Bush Administration referred to these methods as “enhanced interrogation techniques.” Enhanced interrogation techniques included “walling” (quickly pulling the detainee forward and then thrusting him against a flexible false wall), “water dousing,” “waterboarding,” “stress positions” (forcing the detainee to remain in body positions designed to induce physical discomfort), “wall standing” (forcing the detainee to remain standing with his arms outstretched in front of him so that his fingers touch a wall five four to five feet away and support his entire body weight), “cramped confinement” in a box, “insult slaps”, “facial hold”, “attention grasp” (grasping the detainee with both hands, one hand on each side of the collar opening, and quickly drawing him toward the interrogator), forced nudity, sleep deprivation while being vertically shackled, and dietary manipulation.
  3. President Bush stated that about 100 detainees were held under the CIA secret detention programme, about a third of whom were questioned using “enhanced interrogation techniques”.
  4. The CIA’s Office of Inspector General has reportedly investigated a number of “erroneous renditions” in which the CIA had abducted and detained the wrong people. A CIA officer told the Washington Post: “They picked up the wrong people, who had no information.  In many, many cases there was only some vague association” with terrorism.
  5. German national Khaled El-Masri was seized in Macedonia because he had been mistaken for an Al Qaeda suspect with a similar name. He was held incommunicado and abused in Macedonia and in secret CIA detention in Afghanistan. On 13 December 2012, the European Court of Human Rights held that Macedonia had violated El-Masri’s rights under the European Convention on Human Rights, and found that his ill-treatment by the CIA at Skopje airport in Macedonia amounted to torture.
  6. Wesam Abdulrahman Ahmed al-Deemawi was seized in Iran and held for 77 days in the CIA’s “Dark Prison” in Afghanistan.  He was later held in Bagram for 40 days and subjected to sleep deprivation, hung from the ceiling by his arms in the “strappado” position, threatened by dogs, made to watch torture videos, and subjected to sounds of electric sawing accompanied by cries of pain.
  7. Several former interrogators and counterterrorism experts have confirmed that “coercive interrogation” is ineffective. Steven Kleinman, Jack Cloonan, and Matthew Alexander stated in a letter to Congress that that US interrogation policy “came with heavy costs” and that Al Qaeda and like-minded groups recruited a new generation of Jihadists.”
  8. After being extraordinarily rendered by the United States to Egypt in 2002, Ibn al-Shaykh al-Libi, under threat of torture at the hands of Egyptian officials, fabricated information relating to Iraq’s provision of chemical and biological weapons training to Al Qaeda. In 2003, then Secretary of State Colin Powell relied on this fabricated information in his speech to the United Nations that made the case for war against Iraq.
  9. Abu Zubaydah was waterboarded at least 83 times by the CIA. FBI interrogator Ali Soufan testified before Congress that he elicited “actionable intelligence” from Zubaydah using rapport-building techniques but that Zubaydah “shut down” after he was waterboarded.
  10. Torture is prohibited in all circumstances under international law and allegations of torture must be investigated and criminally punished. The United States prosecuted Japanese interrogators for “waterboarding” US prisoners during World War II.
  11. On 20 November 2002, Gul Rahman froze to death in a secret CIA prison in Afghanistan called the “Salt Pit,” after a CIA case officer ordered guards to strip him naked, chain him to the concrete floor, and leave him there overnight without blankets.
  12. Fatima Bouchar was abused by the CIA, and by persons believed to be Thai authorities, for several days in the Bangkok airport. Bouchar reported she was chained to a wall and not fed for five days, at a time when she was four-and-a-half months pregnant. After that she was extraordinarily rendered to Libya.
  13. Syria was one of the “most common destinations for rendered suspects,” as were Egypt and Jordan. One Syrian prison facility contained individual cells that were roughly the size of coffins.  Detainees report incidents of torture involving a chair frame used to stretch the spine (the so-called “German chair”) and beatings.
  14. Muhammed al-Zery and Ahmed Agiza, while seeking asylum in Sweden, were extraordinarily rendered to Egypt where they were tortured with shocks to their genitals.  Al-Zery was also forced to lie on an electrified bed frame.
  15. Abu Omar, an Italian resident, was abducted from the streets of Milan, extraordinarily rendered to Egypt, and secretly detained for fourteen months while Egyptian agents interrogated and tortured him by subjecting him to electric shocks. An Italian court convicted in absentia 22 CIA agents and one Air Force pilot for their roles in the extraordinary rendition of Abu Omar.
  16. Known black sites – secret prisons run by the CIA on foreign soil – existed in Afghanistan, Lithuania, Morocco, Poland, Romania, and Thailand.
  17. Abd al Rahim al Nashiri was secretly detained in various black sites. While secretly detained in Poland, US interrogators subjected al Nashiri to a mock execution with a power drill as he stood naked and hooded; racked a semi-automatic handgun close to his head as he sat shackled before them; held him in “standing stress positions” and threatened to bring in his mother and sexually abuse her in front of him.
  18. President Obama’s 2009 Executive Order repudiating torture does not repudiate the CIA extraordinary rendition programme.  It was specifically crafted to preserve the CIA’s authority to detain terrorist suspects on a short-term, transitory basis prior to rendering them to another country for interrogation or trial.
  19. President Obama’s 2009 Executive Order also established an interagency task force to review interrogation and transfer policies and issue recommendations on “the practices of transferring individuals to other nations.” The interagency task force report was issued in 2009, but continues to be withheld from the public. It appears that the US intends to continue to rely on anti-torture diplomatic assurances from recipient countries, those assurances were not effective safeguards against torture for Maher Arar, who was tortured in Syria, or Ahmed Agiza and Muhammed al-Zery, who were tortured in Egypt.
  20. The Senate Select Intelligence Committee has completed a 6,000 page report that further details the CIA detention and interrogation operations with access to classified sources. In December, 2014, the committee released a heavily redacted 525-page portion of the report.

But this is only the tip of the torture and rendition story.

A full 13 years ago, in February 2005, Jane Mayer reported the Maher Arar case and full extent of the rendition processes in the New Yorker magazine.

Torture 3

Her report is essential reading:

On 27th January, President Bush, in an interview with The Times, assured the world that “torture is never acceptable, nor do we hand over people to countries that do torture.”

Maher Arar, a Canadian engineer who was born in Syria, was surprised to learn of Bush’s statement.

Two and a half years ago, American officials, suspecting Arar of being a terrorist, apprehended him in New York and sent him back to Syria, where he endured months of brutal interrogation, including torture.

When Arar described his experience in a phone interview recently, he invoked an Arabic expression. The pain was so unbearable, he said, that “you forget the milk that you have been fed from the breast of your mother.”

Arar, a 34-year-old graduate of McGill University whose family emigrated to Canada when he was a teenager, was arrested on 26 September 2002, at John F Kennedy Airport.

He was changing planes; he had been on vacation with his family in Tunisia, and was returning to Canada. Arar was detained because his name had been placed on the United States Watch List of terrorist suspects.

He was held for the next 13 days, as American officials questioned him about possible links to another suspected terrorist. Arar said that he barely knew the suspect, although he had worked with the man’s brother.

Arar, who was not formally charged, was placed in handcuffs and leg irons by plainclothes officials and transferred to an executive jet.

The plane flew to Washington, continued to Portland, Maine, stopped in Rome, Italy, then landed in Amman, Jordan.

During the flight, Arar said, he heard the pilots and crew identify themselves in radio communications as members of “the Special Removal Unit”.

The Americans, he learned, planned to take him next to Syria.

Having been told by his parents about the barbaric practices of the police in Syria, Arar begged crew members not to send him there, arguing that he would surely be tortured. His captors did not respond to his request; instead, they invited him to watch a spy thriller that was aired on board.

Ten hours after landing in Jordan, Arar said, he was driven to Syria, where interrogators, after a day of threats, “just began beating on me.” They whipped his hands repeatedly with two-inch-thick electrical cables, and kept him in a windowless underground cell that he likened to a grave. “Not even animals could withstand it,” he said.

Although he initially tried to assert his innocence, he eventually confessed to anything his tormentors wanted him to say. “You just give up,” he said. “You become like an animal.”

A year later, in October, 2003, Arar was released without charges, after the Canadian government took up his cause.

Imad Moustapha, the Syrian Ambassador in Washington, announced that his country had found no links between Arar and terrorism.

Arar is suing the US government for his mistreatment.

“They are outsourcing torture because they know it’s illegal,” he said. “Why, if they have suspicions, don’t they question people within the boundary of the law?”

Rendition was originally carried out on a limited basis, but after 9/11 when President Bush declared a global war on terrorism, the programme expanded beyond recognition – becoming, according to a former CIA official, “an abomination.”

What began as a programme aimed at a small, discrete set of suspects – people against whom there were outstanding foreign arrest warrants – came to include a wide and ill-defined population that the Administration terms “illegal enemy combatants.”

Many of them have never been publicly charged with any crime.

Scott Horton, an expert on international law who helped prepare a report on renditions issued by NYU Law School and the New York City Bar Association, estimates that 150 people have been rendered since 2001.

Representative Ed Markey, a Democrat from Massachusetts and a member of the Select Committee on Homeland Security, said that a more precise number was impossible to obtain.

“I’ve asked people at the CIA for numbers,” he said. “They refuse to answer. All they will say is that they’re in compliance with the law.”

Although the full scope of the extraordinary-rendition programme isn’t known, several recent cases have come to light that may well violate US law.

In 1998, Congress passed legislation declaring that it is: “the policy of the United States not to expel, extradite, or otherwise effect the involuntary return of any person to a country in which there are substantial grounds for believing the person would be in danger of being subjected to torture, regardless of whether the person is physically present in the United States.”

The Bush Administration, however, argued that the threat posed by stateless terrorists who draw no distinction between military and civilian targets is so dire that it requires tough new rules of engagement.

This shift in perspective, labelled the New Paradigm in a memo written by Alberto Gonzales, then the White House counsel: “places a high premium on . . . the ability to quickly obtain information from captured terrorists and their sponsors in order to avoid further atrocities against American civilians,” giving less weight to the rights of suspects. It also questions many international laws of war.

Five days after the attacks on the World Trade Centre and the Pentagon, Vice-President Dick Cheney, reflecting the new outlook, argued, on “Meet the Press,” that the government needed to “work through, sort of, the dark side.”

Cheney went on: “A lot of what needs to be done here will have to be done quietly, without any discussion, using sources and methods that are available to our intelligence agencies, if we’re going to be successful. That’s the world these folks operate in. And so it’s going to be vital for us to use any means at our disposal, basically, to achieve our objective.”

The extraordinary-rendition programme bears little relation to the system of due process afforded suspects in crimes in America.

Terrorism suspects in Europe, Africa, Asia, and the Middle East have often been abducted by hooded or masked American agents, then forced onto a Gulfstream V jet, like the one described by Arar.

This jet, which has been registered to a series of dummy American corporations, such as Bayard Foreign Marketing, of Portland, Oregon, has clearance to land at US military bases.

Upon arriving in foreign countries, rendered suspects often vanish. Detainees are not provided with lawyers, and many families are not informed of their whereabouts.

The most common destinations for rendered suspects are Egypt, Morocco, Syria, and Jordan, all of which have been cited for human-rights violations by the State Department, and are known to torture suspects.

To justify sending detainees to these countries, the Administration appears to be relying on a very fine reading of an imprecise clause in the United Nations Convention Against Torture (which the U.S. ratified in 1994), requiring “substantial grounds for believing” that a detainee will be tortured abroad.

Martin Lederman, a lawyer who left the Justice Department’s Office of Legal Counsel in 2002, after eight years, says: “The Convention only applies when you know a suspect is more likely than not to be tortured, but what if you kind of know? That’s not enough. So there are ways to get around it.”

Rendition is just one element of the Administration’s New Paradigm. The CIA itself is holding dozens of “high value” terrorist suspects outside of the territorial jurisdiction of the U.S., in addition to the estimated five hundred and fifty detainees in Guantánamo Bay, Cuba.

The Administration confirmed the identities of at least 10 of these suspects to the 9/11 Commission – including Khalid Sheikh Mohammed, a top Al Qaeda operative, and Ramzi bin al-Shibh, an alleged chief planner of the 9/11 attacks – but refused to allow Commission members to interview the men, and would not say where they were being held.

Reports have suggested that CIA prisons are being operated in Thailand, Qatar, and Afghanistan, among other countries.

At the request of the CIA, Secretary of Defense Donald Rumsfeld personally ordered that a prisoner in Iraq be hidden from Red Cross officials for several months, and Army General Paul Kern told Congress that the CIA may have hidden up to a hundred detainees.

The Geneva Conventions of 1949, which established norms on the treatment of soldiers and civilians captured in war, require the prompt registration of detainees, so that their treatment can be monitored, but the Administration argues that Al Qaeda members and supporters, who are not part of a state-sponsored military, are not covered by the Conventions.

Gonzales, the new Attorney General, argued during his confirmation proceedings that the UN Convention Against Torture’s ban on “cruel, inhuman, and degrading treatment” of terrorist suspects does not apply to American interrogations of foreigners overseas.

Perhaps surprisingly, the fiercest internal resistance to this thinking has come from people who have been directly involved in interrogation, including veteran FBI and CIA agents.

Their concerns are as much practical as ideological. Years of experience in interrogation have led them to doubt the effectiveness of physical coercion as a means of extracting reliable information.

They also warn that the Bush Administration, having taken so many prisoners outside the realm of the law, may not be able to bring them back in.

By holding detainees indefinitely, without counsel, without charges of wrongdoing, and under circumstances that could, in legal parlance, “shock the conscience” of a court, the Administration has jeopardized its chances of convicting hundreds of suspected terrorists, or even of using them as witnesses in almost any court in the world.

“It’s a big problem,” Jamie Gorelick, a former deputy attorney general and a member of the 9/11 Commission, says.

“In criminal justice, you either prosecute the suspects or let them go. But if you’ve treated them in ways that won’t allow you to prosecute them you’re in this no man’s land. What do you do with these people?”

Among critics is Michael Scheuer, a former CIA counter-terrorism expert who helped establish the practice of rendition.

Scheuer left the agency in 2004, and has written two acerbic critiques of the government’s fight against Islamic terrorism under the pseudonym Anonymous, the most recent of which, “Imperial Hubris,” was a best-seller.

Not long ago, Scheuer, who lives in northern Virginia, spoke openly for the first time about how he and several other top CIA officials set up the programme, in the mid-nineties. “It was begun in desperation,” he told me.

At the time, he was the head of the CIA’s Islamic-militant unit, whose job was to “detect, disrupt, and dismantle” terrorist operations.

His unit spent much of 1996 studying how Al Qaeda operated; by the next year, Scheuer said, its mission was to try to capture bin Laden and his associates. He recalled: “We went to the White House” – which was then occupied by the Clinton Administration – “and they said: ‘Do it.’ ”

He added that Richard Clarke, who was in charge of counter-terrorism for the National Security Council, offered no advice. “He told me, ‘Figure it out by yourselves,’” Scheuer said.

Scheuer sought the counsel of Mary Jo White, the former US Attorney for the Southern District of New York, who, along with a small group of FBI agents, was pursuing the 1993 World Trade Centre bombing case.

In 1998, White’s team obtained an indictment against bin Laden, authorizing U.S. agents to bring him and his associates to the United States to stand trial. From the start, though, the CIA was wary of granting terrorism suspects the due process afforded by American law.

The agency did not want to divulge secrets about its intelligence sources and methods, and American courts demand transparency.

Even establishing the chain of custody of key evidence could easily pose a significant problem: foreign governments might refuse to testify in US courts about how they had obtained the evidence, for fear of having their secret cooperation exposed.

The CIA also felt that other agencies sometimes stood in its way.

In 1996, for example, the State Department stymied a joint effort by the CIA and the FBI to question one of bin Laden’s cousins in America, because he had a diplomatic passport, which protects the holder from US law enforcement.

Describing the CIA’s frustration, Scheuer said: “We were turning into voyeurs. We knew where these people were, but we couldn’t capture them because we had nowhere to take them.”

The agency realized that “we had to come up with a third party.”

The obvious choice, Scheuer said, was Egypt. The largest recipient of US foreign aid after Israel, Egypt was a key strategic ally, and its secret police force, the Mukhabarat, had a reputation for brutality.

Egypt had been frequently cited by the State Department for torture of prisoners.

According to a 2002 report, detainees were “stripped and blindfolded; suspended from a ceiling or doorframe with feet just touching the floor; beaten with fists, whips, metal rods, or other objects; subjected to electrical shocks; and doused with cold water [and] sexually assaulted.”

Hosni Mubarak, Egypt’s leader, who came to office in 1981, after President Anwar Sadat was assassinated by Islamist extremists, was determined to crack down on terrorism.

His prime political enemies were radical Islamists, hundreds of whom had fled the country and joined Al Qaeda. Among these was Ayman al-Zawahiri, a physician from Cairo, who went to Afghanistan and eventually became bin Laden’s deputy.

In 1995, Scheuer said, American agents proposed the rendition programme to Egypt, making clear that it had the resources to track, capture, and transport terrorist suspects globally – including access to a small fleet of aircraft.

Egypt embraced the idea.

“What was clever was that some of the senior people in Al Qaeda were Egyptian,” Scheuer said. “It served American purposes to get these people arrested, and Egyptian purposes to get these people back, where they could be interrogated.”

Technically, US law requires the CIA to seek “assurances” from foreign governments that rendered suspects won’t be tortured.

A series of spectacular covert operations followed from this secret pact. On September 13, 1995, US agents helped kidnap Talaat Fouad Qassem, one of Egypt’s most wanted terrorists, in Croatia.

Qassem had fled to Europe after being linked by Egypt to the assassination of Sadat; he had been sentenced to death in absentia.

Croatian police seized Qassem in Zagreb and handed him over to US agents, who interrogated him aboard a ship cruising the Adriatic Sea and then took him back to Egypt. Once there, Qassem disappeared.

There is no record that he was put on trial.

Hossam el-Hamalawy, an Egyptian journalist who covers human-rights issues, said: “We believe he was executed.”

A more elaborate operation was staged in Tirana, Albania, in the summer of 1998. According to the Wall Street Journal, the CIA provided the Albanian intelligence service with equipment to wiretap the phones of suspected Muslim militants.

Tapes of the conversations were translated into English, and U.S. agents discovered that they contained lengthy discussions with Zawahiri, bin Laden’s deputy.

The US pressured Egypt for assistance; in June, Egypt issued an arrest warrant for Shawki Salama Attiya, one of the militants.

Over the next few months, according to the Journal, Albanian security forces, working with U.S. agents, killed one suspect and captured Attiya and four others.

These men were bound, blindfolded, and taken to an abandoned airbase, then flown by jet to Cairo for interrogation.

Attiya later alleged that he suffered electrical shocks to his genitals, was hung from his limbs, and was kept in a cell in filthy water up to his knees. Two other suspects, who had been sentenced to death in absentia, were hanged.

On 5 August1998, an Arab-language newspaper in London published a letter from the International Islamic Front for Jihad, in which it threatened retaliation against the US for the Albanian operation – in a “language they will understand.”

Two days later, the US Embassies in Kenya and Tanzania were blown up, killing 224 people.

The US began rendering terror suspects to other countries, but the most common destination remained Egypt.

The partnership between the American and the Egyptian intelligence services was extraordinarily close: the Americans could give the Egyptian interrogators questions they wanted put to the detainees in the morning, Scheuer said, and get answers by the evening.

The Americans asked to question suspects directly themselves, but, Scheuer said, the Egyptians refused. “We were never in the same room at the same time.”

Scheuer claimed that “there was a legal process” undergirding these early renditions.

Every suspect who was apprehended, he said, had been convicted in absentia. Before a suspect was captured, a dossier was prepared containing the equivalent of a rap sheet. The CIA’s legal counsel signed off on every proposed operation.

Scheuer said that this system prevented innocent people from being subjected to rendition. “Langley would never let us proceed unless there was substance,” he said. Moreover, Scheuer emphasized, renditions were pursued out of expedience – “not out of thinking it was the best policy.”

Since 9/11, as the number of renditions has grown, and hundreds of terrorist suspects have been deposited indefinitely in places like Guantánamo Bay, the shortcomings of this approach have become manifest. “Are we going to hold these people forever?” Scheuer asked.

“The policymakers hadn’t thought what to do with them, and what would happen when it was found out that we were turning them over to governments that the human-rights world reviled.” Once a detainee’s rights have been violated, he says, “you absolutely can’t” reinstate him into the court system. “You can’t kill him, either,” he added. “All we’ve done is create a nightmare.”

Dan Coleman, an ex-FBI agent claimed the CIA liked rendition from the start.

“They loved that these guys would just disappear off the books, and never be heard of again,” he said. “They were proud of it.”

For 10 years, Coleman worked closely with the CIA on counter-terrorism cases, including the Embassy attacks in Kenya and Tanzania. His methodical style of detective work, in which interrogations were aimed at forging relationships with detainees, became unfashionable after 9/11, in part because the government was intent on extracting information as quickly as possible, to prevent future attacks.

Yet the more patient approach used by Coleman and other agents had yielded major successes. In the Embassy-bombings case, they helped convict four Al Qaeda operatives on three hundred and two criminal counts; all four men pleaded guilty to serious terrorism charges.

The confessions the FBI agents elicited, and the trial itself, which ended in May, 2001, created an invaluable public record about Al Qaeda, including details about its funding mechanisms, its internal structure, and its intention to obtain weapons of mass destruction.

Bad as the policy of rendition was before September 11th, Coleman said: “afterwards it really went out of control.” He explained, “Now, instead of just sending people to third countries, we’re holding them ourselves. We’re taking people, and keeping them in our own custody in third countries. That’s an enormous problem.”

Egypt, he pointed out, at least had an established legal system, however harsh. “There was a process there,” Coleman said. “But what’s our process? We have no method over there other than our laws – and we’ve decided to ignore them. What are we now, the Huns? If you don’t talk to us, we’ll kill you?”

From the beginning of the rendition programme, Coleman said, there was no doubt that Egypt engaged in torture. He recalled the case of a suspect in the first World Trade Centre bombing who fled to Egypt. The US requested his return, and the Egyptians handed him over—wrapped head to toe in duct tape, like a mummy.

Under such circumstances, it might seem difficult for the US government to legally justify dispatching suspects to Egypt. But Coleman said that since 9/11 the CIA “has seemed to think it’s operating under different rules, that it has extra-legal abilities outside the US”

Agents, he said, have “told me that they have their own enormous office of general counsel that rarely tells them no. Whatever they do is all right. It all takes place overseas.”

Coleman was angry that lawyers in Washington were redefining the parameters of counter-terrorism interrogations. “Have any of these guys ever tried to talk to someone who’s been deprived of his clothes?” he asked. “He’s going to be ashamed, and humiliated, and cold. He’ll tell you anything you want to hear to get his clothes back. There’s no value in it.”

Due process made detainees more compliant, not less, Coleman said. He had also found that a defendant’s right to legal counsel was beneficial not only to suspects but also to law-enforcement officers.

Defense lawyers frequently persuaded detainees to cooperate with prosecutors, in exchange for plea agreements. “The lawyers show these guys there’s a way out,” Coleman said. “It’s human nature.

People don’t cooperate with you unless they have some reason to.” He added: “Brutalization doesn’t work. We know that. Besides, you lose your soul.”

Soon after 9/11, US Administration lawyers began advising President Bush that he did not have to comply with the Geneva Conventions in handling detainees in the war on terror.

The lawyers classified these detainees not as civilians or prisoners of war – two categories of individuals protected by the Conventions – but as “illegal enemy combatants.”

The rubric included not only Al Qaeda members and supporters but the entire Taliban, because, the lawyers argued, the country was a “failed state.”

Eric Lewis, an expert in international law who represents several Guantánamo detainees, said: “The Administration’s lawyers created a third category and cast them outside the law.”

The State Department, determined to uphold the Geneva Conventions, fought against Bush’s lawyers and lost.

In a 40 memo, dated January 11, 2002 (which has not been publicly released), William Taft IV, the State Department legal adviser, argued that the Administration’s legal analysis was “seriously flawed.”

Taft wrote that their contention that the President could disregard the Geneva Conventions was “untenable,” “incorrect,” and “confused.”

Others in the Administration worried that the President’s lawyers were wayward.

“Lawyers have to be the voice of reason and sometimes have to put the brakes on, no matter how much the client wants to hear something else,” the former State Department lawyer said.

“Our job is to keep the train on the tracks. It’s not to tell the President, ‘Here are the ways to avoid the law.’ ”

He went on: “There is no such thing as a non-covered person under the Geneva Conventions. It’s nonsense. The protocols cover fighters in everything from world wars to local rebellions.”

According to top State Department officials, Bush decided to suspend the Geneva Conventions on January 8, 2002 – three days before Taft sent his memo.

The legal pronouncements from Washington about the status of detainees were painstakingly constructed to include numerous loopholes.

For example, in February, 2002, President Bush issued a written directive stating that, even though he had determined that the Geneva Conventions did not apply to the war on terror, all detainees should be treated “humanely”.

A close reading of the directive, however, revealed that it referred only to military interrogators – not to CIA officials.

This exemption allowed the CIA to continue using interrogation methods, including rendition that stopped just short of torture.

According to The Times, a secret memo issued by Administration lawyers authorized the CIA to use novel interrogation methods – including “water-boarding,” in which a suspect is bound and immersed in water until he nearly drowns.

Dr Allen Keller, the director of the Bellevue/NYU Programme for Survivors of Torture, told me that he had treated a number of people who had been subjected to such forms of near-asphyxiation, and he argued that it was indeed torture. Some victims were still traumatized years later, he said.

One patient couldn’t take showers, and panicked when it rained. “The fear of being killed is a terrifying experience,” he said.

The Administration’s justification of the rough treatment of detainees appears to have passed down the chain of command.

In late 2003, at Abu Ghraib prison, in Iraq, photographs were taken that documented prisoners being subjected to grotesque abuse by US soldiers.

After the scandal became public, the Justice Department revised the narrow definition of torture, using language that more strongly prohibited physical abuse during interrogations.

Most authorities on interrogation, in and out of government, agree that torture and lesser forms of physical coercion succeed in producing confessions. The problem is that these confessions aren’t necessarily true.

Three of the Guantánamo detainees released by the US to Great Britain last year, for example, had confessed that they had appeared in a blurry video, obtained by American investigators that documented a group of acolytes meeting with bin Laden in Afghanistan.

As reported in The Observer, British intelligence officials arrived at Guantánamo with evidence that the accused men had been living in England at the time the video was made. The detainees told British authorities that they had been coerced into making false confessions.

Craig Murray, the former British Ambassador to Uzbekistan, told me that “the US accepts quite a lot of intelligence from the Uzbeks” that has been extracted from suspects who have been tortured. This information was, he said, “largely rubbish.”

He said he knew of “at least three” instances where the US had rendered suspected militants from Afghanistan to Uzbekistan.

Although Murray does not know the fate of the three men, he said: “They almost certainly would have been tortured.”

In Uzbekistan, he said: “partial boiling of a hand or an arm is quite common.” He also knew of two cases in which prisoners had been boiled to death.

In 2002, Murray, concerned that America was complicit with such a regime, asked his deputy to discuss the problem with the CIA’s station chief in Tashkent.

He said that the station chief did not dispute that intelligence was being obtained under torture. But the CIA did not consider this a problem.

“There was no reason to think they were perturbed,” Murray told me.

Scientific research on the efficacy of torture and rough interrogation is limited, because of the moral and legal impediments to experimentation.

Tom Parker, a former officer for MI5 argued that, whether or not forceful interrogations yield accurate information from terrorist suspects, a larger problem is that many detainees “have nothing to tell.”

For many years, he said, British authorities subjected members of the Irish Republican Army to forceful interrogations, but, in the end, the government concluded that “detainees aren’t valuable.”

A more effective strategy, Parker said, was “being creative” about human intelligence gathering, such as infiltration and eavesdropping. “The U.S. is doing what the British did in the 1970s, detaining people and violating their civil liberties,” he said. “It did nothing but exacerbate the situation. Most of those interned went back to terrorism. You’ll end up radicalizing the entire population.”

Although the Administration has tried to keep the details of extraordinary renditions secret, several accounts have surfaced that reveal how the programme operates.

On 18 December 2001, at Stockholm’s Bromma Airport, a half-dozen hooded security officials ushered two Egyptian asylum seekers, Muhammad Zery and Ahmed Agiza, into an empty office.

They cut off the Egyptians’ clothes with scissors, forcibly administered sedatives by suppository, swaddled them in diapers, and dressed them in orange jumpsuits.

As was reported by Kalla Fakta, a Swedish television news programme, the suspects were blindfolded, placed in handcuffs and leg irons; according to a declassified Swedish government report, the men were then flown to Cairo on a US registered Gulfstream V jet.

Swedish officials have claimed that they received assurances from the Egyptians that Zery and Agiza would be treated humanely. But both suspects have said, through lawyers and family members, that they were tortured with electrical charges to their genitals.

After spending two years in an Egyptian prison, Zery was released. Agiza, a physician who had once been an ally of Zawahiri but later renounced him and terrorism, was convicted on terrorism charges by Egypt’s Supreme Military Court. He was sentenced to twenty-five years in prison.

Another case suggests that the Bush Administration is authorizing the rendition of suspects for whom it has little evidence of guilt.

Mamdouh Habib, an Egyptian-born citizen of Australia, was apprehended in Pakistan in October, 2001.

According to his wife, Habib, a radical Muslim with four children, was visiting the country to tour religious schools and determine if his family should move to Pakistan.

A spokesman at the Pentagon has claimed that Habib – who has expressed support for Islamist causes – spent most of his trip in Afghanistan, and was “either supporting hostile forces or on the battlefield fighting illegally against the US”. Last month, after a three-year ordeal, Habib was released without charges.

Habib is one of a handful of people subjected to rendition who are being represented pro bono by human-rights lawyers.

According to a recently unsealed document prepared by Joseph Margulies, a lawyer affiliated with the MacArthur Justice Centre at the University of Chicago Law School, Habib said that he was first interrogated in Pakistan for three weeks, in part at a facility in Islamabad, where he said he was brutalized.

Some of his interrogators, he claimed, spoke English with American accents. He was then placed in the custody of Americans, two of whom wore black short-sleeved shirts and had distinctive tattoos: one depicted an American flag attached to a flagpole shaped like a finger, the other a large cross.

The Americans took him to an airfield, cut his clothes off with scissors, dressed him in a jumpsuit, covered his eyes with opaque goggles, and placed him aboard a private plane.

He was flown to Egypt.

According to Margulies, Habib was held and interrogated for six months. “Never, to my knowledge, did he make an appearance in any court,” Margulies told me.

Margulies was also unaware of any evidence suggesting that the U.S. sought a promise from Egypt that Habib would not be tortured. For his part, Habib claimed to have been subjected to horrific conditions.

He said that he was beaten frequently with blunt instruments, including an object that he likened to an electric “cattle prod.”

And he was told that if he didn’t confess to belonging to Al Qaeda he would be anally raped by specially trained dogs.

Hossam el-Hamalawy said that Egyptian security forces train German Shepherds for police work, and that other prisoners have also been threatened with rape by trained dogs, although he knows of no one who has been assaulted in this way.

Habib said that he was shackled and forced to stand in three torture chambers: one room was filled with water up to his chin, requiring him to stand on tiptoe for hours; another chamber, filled with water up to his knees, had a ceiling so low that he was forced into a prolonged, painful stoop; in the third, he stood in water up to his ankles, and within sight of an electric switch and a generator, which his jailers said would be used to electrocute him if he didn’t confess.

Habib’s lawyer said that he submitted to his interrogators’ demands and made multiple confessions, all of them false.

After his imprisonment in Egypt, Habib said that he was returned to US custody and was flown to Bagram Air Force Base, in Afghanistan, and then on to Guantánamo Bay, where he was detained until last month.

On 11th January, a few days after the Washington Post published an article on Habib’s case, the Pentagon, offering virtually no explanation, agreed to release him into the custody of the Australian government.

“Habib was released because he was hopelessly embarrassing,” Eric Freedman, a professor at Hofstra Law School, who has been involved in the detainees’ legal defense, says. “It’s a large crack in the wall in a house of cards that is midway through tumbling down.”

In a prepared statement, a Pentagon spokesman, Lieutenant Commander Flex Plexico, said there was “no evidence” that Habib “was tortured or abused” while he was in U.S. custody. He also said that Habib had received “Al Qaeda training,” which included instruction in making false abuse allegations.

Habib’s claims, he suggested, “fit the standard operating procedure.”

The US government has not responded directly to Habib’s charge that he was rendered to Egypt.

However, several other men who were recently released from Guantánamo reported that Habib told them about it.

Jamal al-Harith, a British detainee who was sent home to Manchester, England, last March, told me in a phone interview that at one point he had been placed in a cage across from Habib.

“He said that he had been in Egypt for about six months, and they had injected him with drugs, and hung him from the ceiling, and beaten him very, very badly,” Harith recalled.

“He seemed to be in pain. He was haggard-looking. I never saw him walk. He always had to be held up.”

Another piece of evidence that may support Habib’s story is a set of flight logs documenting the travels of a white Gulfstream V jet – the plane that seems to have been used for renditions by the US government.

These logs show that on 9 April 2002, the jet left Dulles Airport, in Washington, and landed in Cairo. According to Habib’s attorney, this was around the same time that Habib said he was released by the Egyptians in Cairo, and returned to US custody.

The flight logs were obtained by Stephen Grey, a British journalist who has written a number of stories on renditions for British publications, including the London Sunday Times.

Grey’s logs are incomplete, but they chronicle some three hundred flights over three years by the 14-seat jet, which was marked on its tail with the code N379P.

All the flights originated from Dulles Airport, and many of them landed at restricted US military bases.

Even if Habib is a terrorist aligned with Al Qaeda, as Pentagon officials have claimed, it seems unlikely that prosecutors would ever be able to build a strong case against him, given the treatment that he received in Egypt.

John Radsan, a law professor at William Mitchell College of Law, in St Paul, Minnesota, who worked in the general counsel’s office of the CIA until last year, said, “I don’t think anyone’s thought through what we do with these people.”

Similar problems complicate the case of Khalid Sheikh Mohammed, who was captured in Pakistan in March, 2003. Mohammed has reportedly been “water-boarded” during interrogations.

If so, Radsan said, “it would be almost impossible to take him into a criminal trial. Any evidence derived from his interrogation could be seen as fruit from the poisonous tree.

“I think the government is considering some sort of military tribunal somewhere down the line. But, even there, there are still constitutional requirements that you can’t bring in involuntary confessions.

“It’s the law of the jungle. And right now we happen to be the strongest animal.”

 

Supernatural – the spirits of Plympton Cottage

Cottage

I AM a logical thinker and follow no particular religion, but I now know there is something unexplained and spiritual in our world which we simply do not yet understand.

This story begins over half a century ago when I was still a small toddler, playing in my bedroom at our home in Hull.

While playing, I suddenly heard a noise outside. As any inquisitive child might do, I looked out of my first floor window. I glanced right to see the unfamiliar hairy arms of someone emptying a large wooden pot of faeces out of a neighbouring window.

The vision was scary.

I cried and called for my mum to tell her what I had seen. I can still remember her chastising me for climbing on a chair to look out of my window and ordering me never to do it again as it was dangerous and I might fall.

The second experience was about three years later. I was five years old and off school with a high fever and tonsillitis. I was sick and sweating, waiting for the doctor to arrive.

I remember staring out of my ground floor front bedroom window to see a man walking across the street wearing a long brown leather coat and dark Donald Duck type mask. He was carrying a large bag. It was daylight and the vision was real and it has stayed with me ever since.

Only when I went to high school some seven years later did I learn that before proper sanitation in the 16th and 17th centuries, people would throw their waste excrement into the street, often from upstairs windows. I also learned that physicians or ‘quacks’ wore long leather coats and duck-like masks during outbreaks of plague. The beak was filled with pot-pourri to cover the stench of the dead.

Had these been visions from a previous life? Or were they memories locked in inherited DNA from my ancestors?

I do not know.

But unconnected events during 2013 and 2014, made me revisit these earlier memories.

It all started on the warm evening of Tuesday 4 June, 2013.

My wife Gill and I had signed for our new cottage in the sleepy Shropshire market town of Whitchurch the previous day, and had visited it twice over.

At the time, we were still ensconced in my old house in the North Wales’ hills, albeit perched like two flightless birds amid a host of packing cases and rolls of parcel tape and newspaper.

That evening we settled down to watch for the first time the movie The Exorcism of Emily Rose – starring Laura Linney and Jennifer Carpenter. We had spontaneously bought the DVD the previous weekend.

It was dark and the film was gripping. Two thirds of the way through the movie, a priest, played by Tom Wilkinson, begins reciting an exorcism in Latin.

Then it happened… the DVD froze for 10 seconds and both Gill and I smelled the distinctive scent of fresh roses. There were no flowers in our house and neither of us were wearing perfume or after-shave.

It was bizarre.

But the following day, ‘bizarre’ became a bit frightening, as we discovered the scent of roses often accompanies the passing of spirit into the other world and the words recited in the movie were read from a true Latin script on exorcism.

Genuinely shaken, we laughed it off as something weird and unexplained.

But we had no idea about what the next few months would bring.

Just over a week later – on Friday 14 June – we received the keys for our new home in a small market town across the border in North Shropshire.

The house removal was set for Friday 28 June.

We were excited and began moving bits and pieces and undertaking some cleaning of the new house in preparation for the big move.

On Tuesday 18 June, I picked up some gorgeous old pine shelves for our kitchen – perfect for displaying my wife’s collection of TG Green Cornishware pottery.

That afternoon I attached the shelves to the end wall in our kitchen. The shelves looked good and I packed away my tools and cleaned up the dust from the drill holes.

Then, without warning, my large jar of screws – which I had had for over 20 years – suddenly slipped through my hands and smashed all over the quarry tiled kitchen floor, scattering screws almost everywhere. I cursed, but thought nothing of it other than just a simple accident.

But this was just the beginning.

On Friday 28 June, we finally moved house.

At about 2pm, the removal lorry arrived outside our cottage, and Gill and I started by carrying a few boxes through to the conservatory and shed.

Twenty minutes into our task, my dear wife suddenly screamed in agony as she fell into a small hole in our back lawn.

We rang for an ambulance and they rushed her to hospital.

Within a few hours doctors diagnosed that she had ruptured the tendons around her left knee and broken the knee cap… all in a fall into a small and previously unseen hole in the garden.

Six weeks of bed rest followed during our hottest summer in years, while I unpacked our belongings, filled drawers, put up pictures and started to experience something very strange.

The cottage was warm, cosy and above all full of character and charm.

Over the years, it had been extended and undergone several alterations, including the transformation of a side passage into the main body of the house, which was in turn enlarged the kitchen.

And it is in this extended area of the kitchen where the unexplained started to happen.

In the same area of the kitchen where I had dropped the jar of screws, I also dropped a plate full of food, and a week later a bag full of peas and numerous smaller items.

In September 2013, Gill was mobile again and my mother came to stay.

While she was sitting at the kitchen table, I offered to show her Gill’s prize piece of Cornishware pottery from the display shelves: a small blue and cream striped cheese pot.

It is a piece of pottery I had handled many times before, but on this occasion, its lid suddenly flew from the pot and smashed on the kitchen floor.

It was after this that we began to note the accidents in this corner of the kitchen.

In just under eight months, we individually and collectively (my wife, my son, my mother and I) dropped over 50 items in this small area of the kitchen, including a glass of wine, a stack of baking tins and a tub of cooking oil.

I also dropped and broke a mug and a wooden box of incense sticks in the zone and one evening an ironing board fell on my wife’s head in the same area.

We christened the area our “Drop Spirit Zone”.

In November 2013, we began some amateur investigations into what might be going on.

With the lights turned off, I walked slowly into the darkened kitchen and as I passed the threshold I felt a vibration pass across my shoulders.

I stood still. Suddenly a plastic pot of vitamin pills fell onto the floor behind me.

Then events took another twist.

I took my £400 camera phone to photograph this area of the kitchen, hoping to catch something.

As I held the camera ready to shoot, it fell from my grasp onto the floor. Thankfully, it was in a padded case and did not break.

But then weird got weirder…

Since we started the investigations I began to experience a recurring dream – the first such dream I have had since I was a small child.

The dream is plain in its simplicity… I walk into our kitchen alone at night and sit at the breakfast table.

I look down at our cat in his basket (the basket is placed in the Drop Spirit Zone at night, for no other reason than it is close to a radiator).

Alongside the cat and kneeling down is a young girl, aged about seven-years-old. She is stroking our grey haired moggie.

The girl has unkempt light brown hair, a freckled face and sad blue eyes. She is wearing a beige coloured dress with a distinct tie band around her waist.

She looks up at me and says: “I like cats”.

She tells me her name is Edith. Then she asks me: “Do you have any bread, Sir?”

I stand and walk to our bread bin and get a crust of thick-sliced white for her. When I return she is running into our pantry and down a steep staircase out of sight.

It is at this point I awake.

I had this exact same dream at least a dozen times over a period of three months.

But it doesn’t end there… on 19 November 2013, my wife and I were drinking mugs of coffee while finishing our breakfast in our kitchen.

I was sitting on one side of our old pine table and Gill was sitting three feet to the left of me. We were talking blandly about the day ahead.

Suddenly, and without warning, Gill’s almost full mug of hot coffee leapt upwards in her hand and spilled down her clothes, scalding her lap.

I looked at her amazed and she returned the look with an added look of fear in her eyes.

Together, we mopped up the spilt coffee and checked she was not badly scalded.

I commented: “Do you realise you are sitting in the Drop Spirit Zone?”

“Yes,” she replied. “It was like some small hand suddenly pushed my mug upwards.”

A few seconds before the incident, Gill had just finished eating the last piece of bread on the table.

Five weeks later we were again eating breakfast at our kitchen table. Gill was sitting to my left – inside the Drop Spirit Zone – and I was sitting slightly outside it.

Our old cat Frankie was sat on the quarry-tiled floor next to my wife.

Suddenly our normally docile cat leapt into the air, meowed loudly and darted into the living room, where he hid under the coffee table.

My wife and I stared at each other in amazement until we both simultaneously uttered: “The Drop Spirit Zone!”

Following that event, Frankie stopped sitting on the floor in the kitchen, preferring to perch on our old pine settle to watch us eat breakfast.

But something else started to rattle our sense of the explained.

From December 2013, we both heard strange sounds at night emanating from our kitchen.

Often sitting bolt upright in bed, we listened keenly.

It sounded as if our kitchen chairs are being dragged across our quarry tiled floor.

So we set up our own experiment to try and clarify whether this was the case or whether it was all in our collective imaginations.

Before retiring to bed one night, Gill placed a small marker on the kitchen floor, next to the chair which sits inside the Drop Spirit Zone.

That night we heard the usual scraping sounds.

The next morning, to our amazement, we discovered the marker had moved about two inches from its spot… but the chair had moved over seven inches!

Chair

But it was in the New Year when events took a twist in the most bizarre way imaginable.

On the night of Sunday 12 January 2014, I experienced a vivid dream in which I was helping three older men bury dead bodies in a huge ditch, by a dusty road. My job in the dream was to shovel white powder over the bodies as they were thrown in the common grave.

The mens’ names were Parcel, Coppice and Huddlestone.

The next day (Monday, 13 January) I made a startling and mind-blowing discovery!

As part of a Google search, I discovered through the Shropshire county archives that our house and garden lay on a ‘cemetery of unknown origin’.

The archive states that there had been an archeological excavation sometimes during the previous 70 years and seven extended skeletons were discovered.

I spoke with an expert at Shropshire Council Environment History Team, who looked at the files surrounding the excavation work here.

The seven skeletons were unearthed sometime between 1938 and 1950 while the foundations were dug for the kitchen extension!

At the time, they were thought to be Roman remains, but as there was no Carbon 14 dating techniques back then, there was no way to precisely date how old they were.

Another hypothesis was that it may have been a plague pit, possibly dating from the huge outbreak of bubonic plague in the town in 1650.

The council guy said there was no way of knowing what happened to the skeletons when they were unearthed.

He thought they might have been given a Christian burial in the local churchyard OR left in place.

And without further excavation work there was no way of knowing how many more there were – or are.

Further internet searches, combined with a brief scour of some 3,400 graves at our local cemetery led to the next heart-stopping discovery… Purcell, Coppage and Huddlestone are all common and historic surnames in the town.

We also found the grave of an eight-year-old girl called Edith!

So why did those names and the burials occur in my dreams before I had any knowledge of any of them?

Were spirits invading my sleeping senses?

On Tuesday 14 January 2014 another surprise was awaiting me.

I spoke to a lady at our local heritage centre about the skeleton find and was shocked by her response.

The young woman I spoke to was almost dumbstruck when I told her where I lived.

She stuttered slightly as she told me she used to live in this same cottage a few years earlier.

And one of the reasons she moved out was she believed it was “haunted”.

She spoke at length about objects dropping to the floor, mirrors and pictures falling from the wall, objects disappearing and the sound of footsteps on the landing when no one else was in the house.

She also said areas of the house were distinctly cold, even in the summer… something we had also noted.

Like us, this lady thought she was going crazy or imagining things.

But from that moment we knew we were not alone and were far from crazy.

On the night of Tuesday 14 January I awoke from another odd dream.

In this edge of darkness mind game there was a horse in our house and it kept rearing up on its hind legs to cuddle me.

I was comforted in the dream by my wife telling me that: “horses are affectionate pets and enjoy cuddles.”

It was just after lunch on Wednesday 15 January, that I first spoke with a local history and archeology expert called Mary.

She was deeply intrigued about the skeleton find… especially as her grandmother used to live in our cottage!

Her grandmother moved away from the cottage in 1938 and no human skeletons had been unearthed prior to then.

But it was what Mary told me next that shook me.

During the 1930s the bones of a shire horse were unearthed from our back garden. Her grandmother discovered the horse had been buried prior to 1902 by the people who owned the adjoining rectory.

No obvious link to the buried human skeletons, but yet another haunting appendage to a dream!

On Friday 17 January 2014 I mentioned the skeleton discovery to the husband of another former occupant of our house.

He was deeply curious and wanted to know more before saying: “You don’t think you are haunted do you?”

I hadn’t even mentioned the unexplained phenomena to him!

Then on Tuesday 21 January I tracked down yet another former occupant.

The lady wished to remain anonymous as she too fears people will think she is crazy.

She said: “I only stayed for six months. The cottage was lovely but it spooked me completely.

“Things were always falling and there was a clanking sound downstairs at night. My dog would suddenly bark at shadows in the kitchen and I never felt I was alone… it was like someone was watching me all the time.”

She was not alone… at least seven people have so far admitted to experiencing the hauntings of our home.

Then, under advice from a spirit expert, I took a series of photos on the Drop Spirit Zone in our kitchen.

One particular picture rocked me. It appears to show more than half a dozen orbs floating in that area of the kitchen.

Orbs night

The lens of the camera was clean and the images only appear in one frame… all the others are clear.

Then something fascinating happened… For as long as I have known I sometimes talk in my sleep.

On the night of Saturday 1 February (my birthday) I had drunk a few glasses of wine and slept very deeply.

But not as deeply as I imagined it seems.

Around 4am, Gill was woken by me muttering words and phrases in Latin. She used her iPhone to record my ramblings which included disturbing words such as spiritu sancti (holy spirit or ghost) and malum (evil).

I later woke around 8am with the words Dominy miseree nobise rattling round my skull.

Gill and I talked at length about my dream and these words, in particular the words I awoke to.

We looked them up and they appear to be Domine Miserere Nobis, which means: Lord Have Mercy Upon Us.

I must make clear that I have absolutely no knowledge of Latin.

The mysteries of the dreams and the unexplained activity in our former kitchen remained, but shortly before I moved house in January 2015, I gained some clarity about the origin of the skeletons.

While talking to an elderly neighbour, I discovered that our kitchen extension was built at the same time as the large detached house to the north of our property.

It was during the building excavations for this house and our kitchen – which lies some four feet lower than the footings of the property next door – that the skeletons were unearthed.

The large detached house was built on the foundations of an old Victorian lunatic asylum, which originally adjoined our property, but had been demolished some years earlier.

The asylum was privately owned and associated with the workhouse/poor house which is situated some 800 yards away to the east of our former cottage.

The workhouse now forms part of the town’s community hospital.

Anyway, it transpired that the owner of the asylum regularly buried bodies in the grounds of his property.

As these poor people were considered to be inhabited by demons, their bodies could not be buried on sacred church grounds.

It was assumed by the builders who unearthed the skeletons in the 1940s that there were likely to be many more buried in the same vicinity both in the gardens of our cottage and the large house.

When we moved away from Whitchurch we were left no wiser as to whether the skeletons were removed and reburied somewhere else or were simply covered with rubble and concrete.

Up until the date of our move we still experienced dozens of things falling in the Drop Spirit Zone – a box of six eggs sliding across the kitchen table and smashing to the floor, followed by a pack of bacon, were all quite memorable.

It was all part and parcel of living in that cottage.

Then 10 months later, the unexplained became bizarre and unearthly.

On Wednesday, 11 November 2015, I drove to Whitchurch to spend the evening with an old friend.

We had arranged to meet at 7pm and I arrived early in the town.

Spontaneously, I decided to park the car outside my former home and pay some last respects to our lovely cottage. I got out of the car to stretch my legs and looked at the front of the building.

Suddenly my mobile phone buzzed in my back pocket.

I took the phone out to see if there was a text or email message for me.

To my surprise the phone was frozen with only the time displaying on the lock screen: 18:43.

I tried to unfreeze the phone, but with no luck. Even removing the SIM and Memory cards failed to jog the phone back into life!

Two hours later with the phone still frozen, I explained my predicament to my friend as we supped a beer in the local pub.

Together we finally managed a Hard Reset on the phone and brought it back to life… but I had sadly lost over 200 saved photographs!

Then the penny dropped: the cottage was built in 1843… so the spirits are still active!

And they probably still walk that twilight zone, which we have yet to understand.