Indian author’s new book is finding its way back home to the Himalayas

BLOG BOOK front

A STUNNING debut book of poetry and prose published two weeks ago is now finding its way back home to a small hill fort town in the Himalayas.

Don’t Look Down by first-time author Ritambhara Chowfin was penned in the town of Almora in the Himalayan foothills of northern India.

But it was edited and published in England and printed in Poland!

Now the first few copies are finding their way back to Almora’s two public libraries and the town’s English speaking journal The Uttaranchal Deep Newspaper.

Don’t Look Down was first published on 6th October in both paperback and e-book and with burgeoning worldwide sales the first press release has been read by more than 10,000 people in places as diverse as Canada, Germany, the UAE, Singapore, Hong Kong, Indonesia, the Netherlands and the USA, as well as hundreds more the UK and India.

Ritambhara is a 25-year-old graduate in English Language and Literature from Amity University in Delhi. She is the eldest of three siblings and returned to her home town for the inspiration to write about the world she knows.

Ritambhara says she is overwhelmed by the “amazing and lovely reaction to my book.”

“Although Hindi is my first language, I love English and the UK,” she adds. “The whole process of writing and watching my book being published has been a total joy.

“And now the reaction from friends, family and even former teachers has taken my breath away.”

Editor and publisher Nic Outterside, who owns the publishing house Time is an Ocean says: “Working with Ritambhara has been an utter pleasure.

“I am very proud of this book, and of her. The worldwide reaction to her book has been amazing.”

Don’t Look Down is available in paperback priced at £4.99 (US $6.15) from most Amazon portals

www.amazon.co.uk/Dont-Look-Down-Ritambhara-Chowfin/dp/1698038674/

www.amazon.com/Dont-Look-Down-Ritambhara-Chowfin/dp/1698038674/

A Kindle e-book edition of Don’t Look Down is also available for £1.99 (US$2.45) (174IR) from all Amazon portals

www.amazon.co.uk/Dont-Look-Down-Ritambhara-Chowfin-ebook/dp/B07YVH8WS3/

www.amazon.com/dp/B07YVH8WS3/

www.amazon.in/dp/B07YVH8WS3

New book of shared humanity written in the Himalayas and edited in England

BLOG Cover

A sensational debut book of poetry and prose is published worldwide this week despite its writer and editor living 5,000 miles apart.

Don’t Look Down by first-time author Ritambhara Chowfin was entirely penned in the small hill fort town of Almora, some 5,400ft above sea level in the Himalayan foothills in northern India.

It has been edited and published by award winning editor Nic Outterside in Wolverhampton in the English west Midlands.

This transcendent work forms part of a personal journey out of darkness and into light, where love and theft are in constant conflict.

Within Don’t Look Down readers will find the thoughts and poetic musings of a young Indian woman born and raised in a part of the planet visited by very few others.

The leopards growling in the forest, the black bear snuffling among the lush vegetation, an old witch casting a spell for childbirth and the tall cedars and pines swaying in the lashing rain, may be a world away from the one you inhabit.

But this young woman is exactly like anyone else, whether they live in New York, London, Cairo, Buenos Aires, Lagos or Melbourne.

She has the same fears, the same loves, the same faults, the same frailties, the same hopes, the same passions and the same emotions; and these all come tumbling out in her poetry and prose.

Like everyone else she is human, and is trying to make sense of her life and this world.

Ritambhara is a 25-year-old graduate in English Language and Literature from Amity University in Delhi. She is the eldest of three siblings and returned to her home town for the inspiration to write about the world she knows.

Don’t Look Down is her first published book.

“Although Hindi is my first language, I love English and the UK,” she says.

“I have relations in Warrington and my dream is one day to visit them.

“I reached out to Nic earlier this year as we both had dealings with a story-teller in my town and I knew him to be a brilliant editor. He agreed immediately to edit and publish my first book. And the whole process has been a joy.”

Nic, who owns the publishing house Time is an Ocean says: “Working with Ritambhara has been an utter pleasure. Her writing is so deeply filled with emotion and her use of English is stunning.

“I am very proud of this book, and of her. It is amazing what can be achieved across 5,000 miles by email, WhatsApp and Instagram,” he added.

“The added bonus is I now consider Ritambhara as a very close friend.”

 

Don’t Look Down is available in paperback priced at £4.99 (US $6.15) from most Amazon portals

www.amazon.co.uk/Dont-Look-Down-Ritambhara-Chowfin/dp/1698038674/

www.amazon.com/Dont-Look-Down-Ritambhara-Chowfin/dp/1698038674/

 

A Kindle e-book edition of Don’t Look Down is also available for £1.99 (US$2.45) (174IR) from all Amazon portals

www.amazon.co.uk/Dont-Look-Down-Ritambhara-Chowfin-ebook/dp/B07YVH8WS3/

www.amazon.com/dp/B07YVH8WS3/

www.amazon.in/dp/B07YVH8WS3

 

 

Unique book of international poetry available in paperback and Kindle

BLOG LUMINANCE paperbacks

A UNIQUE collection of international poetry, first published as an e-book in 2018 is now available worldwide as a large format paperback.

While global warming, poverty, pollution, homelessness, the refugee crisis and warfare continue to dominate world news, a diverse group of global poets have turned their spotlight on the frailty and hope of humanity.

Their book: LUMINANCE – Words for a World Gone Wrong is now published worldwide by Amazon as a stunning 125 page paperback.

The writers live 11,000 miles apart, across 18 time zones, in Australia, Bangladesh, Canada, Palestine, Japan, England, Scotland and six different states of the USA.

They include a mum of four, a 17-year-old student, a haiku writer, a freedom fighter, a grandfather, a modern day minstrel, a novelist and a self-proclaimed ‘mystic’.

Their poetry displays the diversity of their home cities and cultures and form the unique nature of the book.

The writers of LUMINANCE are:

Austie M Baird is a 34-year-old mother raising four young children in rural eastern Oregon, USA.

Sophie Bowns, 27, from Cumbria in England, is a teaching assistant, poet and a fiction author, with seven published books to her name.

Hanalee is a widely travelled 18-year-old gardening enthusiast from Phoenix, Arizona, now at university in Iowa.

Bridgford Hashimoko, 54, is an EFL teacher in Tokyo, Japan, who is fascinated by the many forms and variations of Haiku.

Annabel James, from Oklahoma, USA, writes poetry as a positive outlet to manage a chaos of emotions and thoughts into a form that she can share.

Anjali Love is a mystic, poet, writer, storyteller, artist, and tantric yogini, from Melbourne, Australia and is a lover of life with insatiable wanderlust.

Heather Lynn Matthews is a married 32-year-old mother of two, from Ontario, Canada, who loves to write poetry and short stories.

Joseph Nichols lives in Kentucky, USA. By day, he works for the state transportation cabinet and by the weekend he is a minstrel and DJ.

Nic Outterside, from Wolverhampton, England spent 28 years in journalism. He discovered the therapeutic power of poetry following a nervous breakdown in 2013.

Brotibir Roy is a 18-year-old and a 12th standard student in Dhaka, Bangladesh, who writes to pacify his mind and to play with words.

Megan Taylor, 22, is an English and Film graduate from Aberdeen University in Scotland.

Troy Turner was born and raised in Los Angeles, USA. Nothing has captivated him so much as the written word and the interaction between author and reader.

Zanita is a 38-year-old college lecturer from Gaza in Palestine. When not teaching, she publishes books to support the liberation of her country from the control of Israel.

Nic Outterside is the editor and publisher of LUMINANCE and said: “I have edited many publications over the years, but none has been as challenging and exciting as this.

“I was lucky to have so many amazingly talented and beautiful people contributing to this hugely diverse project.

“I hope you enjoy and share their end result… we all think it is quite amazing.”

LUMINANCE – Words for a World Gone Wrong can be purchased via Amazon at:

WORLDWIDE: www.amazon.com/dp/1796270032/  price $9.71

UK: www.amazon.co.uk/dp/1796270032/   price £7.50

FRANCE: www.amazon.fr/LUMINANCE-Words-World-Gone-Wrong/dp/1796270032/   price: 9.05 euros

SPAIN: www.amazon.es/dp/1796270032 price 8.92 euros

JAPAN: www.amazon.co.jp/dp/1796270032/ price 1,150 Yen

ITALY: www.amazon.co.it/dp/1796270032/ price 8.92 euros

GERMANY: www.amazon.co.it/dp/1796270032/ price 9.18 euros

And on Kindle e-book at ALL 13 Amazon international sites

Unique book of international poetry published in paperback today

BLOG LUMINANCE FULL COVER

A UNIQUE collection of international poetry, first published as an e-book almost nine months ago, is released worldwide in paperback today (11 February 2019).

While global warming, poverty, pollution, homelessness, the refugee crisis and warfare continue to dominate world news, a diverse group of global poets have turned their spotlight on the frailty and hope of humanity.

Their book: LUMINANCE – Words for a World Gone Wrong is now published worldwide by Amazon as a stunning 125 page paperback.

The writers live and work 11,000 miles apart, across 18 time zones, in Australia, Bangladesh, Canada, Palestine, Japan, England, Scotland and six different states of the USA.

They include a mum of four, a 16 year-old school student, a haiku writer, a freedom fighter, a grandfather, a modern day minstrel, a novelist and a self-proclaimed ‘mystic’.

Their poetry displays the diversity of their home cities and cultures and form the unique nature of the book.

The writers of LUMINANCE are:

Austie M Baird is a 33-year-old mother raising four young children in rural eastern Oregon, USA.

Sophie Bowns, 26, from Cumbria in England, is a teaching assistant and a fiction author, with five published books to her name.

Hanalee is a widely travelled 18-year-old American gardening enthusiast from Phoenix, Arizona.

Bridgford Hashimoko, 53, is an EFL teacher in Tokyo, Japan, who is fascinated by the many forms and variations of Haiku.

Annabel James, from Oklahoma, USA, writes poetry as a positive outlet to manage a chaos of emotions and thoughts into a form that she can share.

Anjali Love is a mystic, poet, writer, storyteller, artist, and tantric yogini, from Melbourne, Australia and is a lover of life with insatiable wanderlust.

Heather Lynn Matthews is a married 31-year-old mother of two, from Ontario, Canada, who loves to write poetry and short stories.

Joseph Nichols lives in Kentucky, USA. By day, he works for the state transportation cabinet and by the weekend he is a minstrel and DJ.

Nic Outterside, from Wolverhampton in England spent almost 30 years in journalism. He discovered the therapeutic power of writing poetry following a nervous breakdown in 2013.

Brotibir Roy is a 17-year-old and a 11th standard student in Dhaka, Bangladesh, who writes to pacify his mind and to play with words.

Megan Taylor, 22, is an English and Film graduate from Aberdeen University in Scotland.

Troy Turner was born and raised in Los Angeles, USA. Nothing has captivated him so much as the written word and the interaction between author and reader.

Zanita is a 37-year-old college lecturer from Gaza in Palestine. When not teaching, she publishes books to support the liberation of her country from the control of Israel.

Nic Outterside is the editor and publisher of LUMINANCE.

“I have edited many publications over the years,” says Nic, “But none has been as challenging and exciting as this.

“I was lucky to have so many amazingly talented and beautiful people contributing to this hugely diverse project.

“I hope you enjoy and share their end result… we all think it has all been worthwhile.”

LUMINANCE – Words for a World Gone Wrong can be purchased via Amazon outlets at:

WORLDWIDE: https://www.amazon.com/dp/1796270032/  price $9.71

UK: https://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/1796270032/   price £7.50

JAPAN: https://www.amazon.co.jp/dp/1796270032/  price 1,150 Yen

ITALY: https://www.amazon.co.it/dp/1796270032/  price 8.92 euros

GERMANY: https://www.amazon.co.it/dp/1796270032/  price 9.18 euros

And on Kindle e-book at ALL 13 Amazon sites

 

 

 

Introducing the poets of Luminance who shine a light on a world gone wrong

 

BLOG WRITERS2A UNIQUE new book has brought together a collection of amazing and diverse poets to shine a light of words on a world gone wrong.

While global warming, poverty, homelessness, the refugee crisis and warfare dominate world news, the poets of LUMINANCE turn a spotlight on the frailty and hope of humanity.

The writers include a 32 year-old mum of four, a 16 year-old school student, a haiku writer, a freedom fighter, a 62-year-old grandfather, a modern day minstrel, a novelist and a self-proclaimed ‘mystic’.

Their poetry is breath-taking in its style, its range and its subject matter, falling nimbly into the categories: Darkness and Light, Heaven and Hell, Love and Theft, and War and Peace.

BLOG COVER

Most of the writers have, until now, only seen their work published on social media.

They live and work 11,000 miles apart, across 18 time zones, in Australia, Bangladesh, Canada, Palestine, Japan, England, Scotland and six different states of the USA. Their writings display the diversity of their home cities and cultures and form the unique nature of the book.

The writers of LUMINANCE are:

Austie M Baird is a 32-year-old mother raising four young children in rural eastern Oregon, USA.

Sophie Bowns, 25, from Cumbria in England, is a trainee teaching assistant and a fiction author, with four published books to her name.

Hanalee is a 17-year-old American gardening enthusiast from Phoenix, Arizona, who plans on attending college at the University of Iowa in the autumn.

Bridgford Hashimoko, 52, is an EFL teacher in Tokyo, Japan, who is fascinated by the many forms and variations of Haiku.

Annabel James, from Oklahoma, USA, writes poetry as a positive outlet to manage a chaos of emotions and thoughts into a form that she can share.

Anjali Love is a mystic, poet, writer, storyteller, artist, and tantric yogini, from Melbourne, Australia and is a lover of life with insatiable wanderlust.

Heather Lynn Matthews is a married 30-year-old mother of two, from Ontario, Canada, who loves to write poetry and short stories.

Joseph Nichols is a graduate of EKU’s Bluegrass Writers Studio, and lives in Kentucky, USA. By day, he works for the state transportation cabinet; by weekend, he is a minstrel with A to Z Productions Mobile DJ.

Nic Outterside, from Wolverhampton in England spent almost 30 years in newspaper and magazine journalism. He discovered the therapeutic power of writing poetry following a nervous breakdown in 2013.

Brotibir Roy is a 16-year-old and a 10th standard student in Dhaka, Bangladesh, who writes to pacify his mind and to play with words.

Megan Taylor, 21, is an English and Film student currently studying at Aberdeen University in Scotland.

Troy Turner is born and raised in Los Angeles, USA. Nothing has captivated him so much as the written word and the interaction between author and reader.

Zanita is a 36-year-old college lecturer from Gaza in Palestine. When not teaching, she publishes books and leaflets to support the liberation of her country from the control of Israel.

Nic Outterside is the publisher of LUMINANCE.

“I have edited many publications over the years,” says Nic, “But none has been as challenging and exciting as this.

“I was lucky to have so many amazingly talented and beautiful people contributing to this hugely diverse project.

“Their writing alone is breath-taking, but it doesn’t stop there… they were all brimming with ideas about the book, its publicity and ways to reach more readers than I ever believed possible.

“And we all hope you enjoy and share their end result… we think it has all been worthwhile.”

Stay tuned for more news about LUMINANCE in the run-up to publication on Monday 30 April 2018.

 

New book unites 14 poets to shine a light on a world gone wrong

BLOG COVER

A UNIQUE new book has brought together 14 diverse poets to shine a light on a world gone wrong.

While global warming, poverty, homelessness, the refugee crisis and warfare dominate world news, the poets of LUMINANCE shine a blinding light on the frailty and hope of humanity.

The writers include a 32 year-old mum of four from Oregon, USA, a 16 year-old school student from Bangladesh, a haiku writer in Japan, a freedom fighter from Palestine, a 62-year-old grandfather, a novelist living in England’s Lake District and a self-proclaimed ‘mystic’ from Melbourne, Australia.

The project has been pulled together by a retired newspaper editor.

Most of the writers have, until now, only seen their work published on social media.

Now, LUMINANCE is providing a professionally produced anthology of their poetry and prose for worldwide publication at the end of April.

This “family” of contributors live and work up to 11,000 miles apart, across 18 time zones, in Melbourne, Dhaka, Ontario, Gaza, Hong Kong, Tokyo, England, Scotland and six different states of the USA. Their writings display the diversity of their home cities and cultures and form the unique nature of the book.

“As individuals we are all so very different; different cultures, ages, races, genders, but as writers we have been able to form an incredible bond that reflects the many ways that, as humans we have common needs, hopes, dreams and hearts,” says mum Austie Baird from Oregon.

“This project has provided an incredible opportunity to see the way that different voices can come together from around the world to carry forth unified sentiments of hope, hurt, suffering and support.

“Together, I believe our words are shining a blinding light on the reality of being human, in a world of seeming chaos.”

Zanita, 36, a college lecturer in occupied Palestine is effusive about the project. “We are all voices in the dark until others react and in doing so shine a light on our words,” she says.

“I think of myself as a poet and a freedom fighter for my beloved country… but we are all freedom fighters for our own faith for a better world.”

Retired newspaper and magazine editor Nic Outterside from Wolverhampton, England is the editor and publisher of LUMINANCE.

“I have edited many publications over the years,” says Nic, “But none has been as challenging and exciting as this.

“I am so lucky to have so many amazingly talented and beautiful people contributing to this hugely diverse project.

“Their writing alone is breath-taking, but it doesn’t stop there… they are all brimming with ideas about the book, its publicity and ways to reach more readers than I ever believed possible. Their excitement is palpable.

“My working day is unlike anything I have ever known… one minute I can be chatting with a writer who is eating sushi in Tokyo, the next I am swapping emails with another in Oklahoma or taking a voice message from a poet in war torn Gaza.”

  • Stay tuned for more news about LUMINANCE in the run-up to publication on Monday 30 April 2018.

Brief Encounter #8

supermacMalcolm MacDonald

I ENJOYED three brief encounters with the legendary Supermac, the first separated from the last by a mere 35 years!

The first time I met the former England star was in 1970. I was 14 years-old and the free scoring Malcolm Macdonald just six years older than me and turning heads with his robust play and 49 goals for second tier side Luton Town.

He had yet to acquire the moniker Supermac, but was definitely a legend in the making when he agreed to kick off a local charity football match… a game also graced by Radio 1 stars Ed ‘Stewpot’ Stewart and Diddy David Hamilton. Along with many other young teenage boys I queued in line to ask for his autograph. The immensely polite Macdonald signed every autograph request with a smile and chirpy word.

Over the ensuing years the bustling forward went on to score a further 137 goals for Arsenal and Newcastle United, where he became a true Tyneside legend. On 16th April 1975, in a game for England against Cyprus he scored all five goals in a 5–0 victory, a record that still stands today, spawning a newspaper headline: SuperMac 5 Cyprus 0. In total he played 14 times for his country, scoring six times.

When I next met him, it was by chance in 1997, some nine years after he retired from a football, following an eight year stint in club management.

It was lunchtime on a cold and wet November day and I was queuing for a sandwich in a café just off Newcastle’s Groat Market. The guy in front of me seemed to be taking his time ordering a coffee and a roll. As he turned I instantly recognised the man I had met all those years ago. But for the grey hair, spectacles and ageing face the voice was the same… it was Supermac.

He smiled and politely apologised for taking so long and then sat down at a window seat to eat his lunch and read the local evening newspaper.

The final time we met was a complete shock… out of time and out of place.

It was 2004 and again a cold and grey November day. My wife and I were manning a car boot sale stall at Hexham Cattle Market. We had a pile of personal flotsam and jetsam we were trying to sell, including ornaments, toys, books and DVDs.

An hour into the sale a man, dressed in a light brown sheepskin coat was standing at our stall with a young boy looking through the DVDs. He picked one up and asked me: “How much is this?” He looked at me and smiled and I again realised it was Supermac. I was about to reply when a passing stranger hailed him: “Whey aye how are you doing Mac?”

“Hello, John,” was his reply.

Macdonald and the boy turned to talk to the stranger and my opportunity to sell him a book and a DVD on fly fishing was lost.