37 Labour MPs Walked Away with Syrian Blood on Their Hands

sYRIA BOMBS

More than half the Labour members who voted to bomb Syria in 2015 are no longer Labour MPs

ONE post-election revelation may surprise members and supporters of the Labour Party.

Just seven days after the General Election defeat it can be revealed that 37 of the 66 Labour MPs (56%) who supported David Cameron’s demand to bomb Syria in a Commons Motion on 2nd December 2015 are NO LONGER Labour MPs.

They have quite literally walked away from responsibility with the death of thousands on their hands.

The 2015 debate and vote on whether to extend British bombing of Isis into Syria was high profile and controversial for many reasons.

Labour MPs were given a free vote and allowed to vote according to their views. Most – including the majority of the Shadow Cabinet – opposed the bombing, in line with Jeremy Corbyn.

David Cameron won the Syria airstrikes vote by majority of 174.

But 66 Labour MPs voted with the Conservatives in support of the strikes. When the votes were counted MPs voted 397 to 223 in favour of sending RAF Tornados into the skies over Syria.

Corbyn was forced by divisions in his party to give his MPs a free vote, and a majority of his MPs and nearly half the shadow cabinet opposed the airstrikes.

But his foreign affairs spokesman, Hilary Benn, prompted applause from the Government benches when he gave an impassioned speech in favour of the bombing.

The debate was one of the first tests of Corbyn’s leadership and the voting publically showed those MPs who were prepared to go against him.

The bombing of Syria by US and UK planes between 2014 and 2019 has led to over 14,000 deaths on the ground – including an estimated 3,800 innocent civilians.

Now, exactly four years since that controversial House of Commons vote, it can be revealed that more than half of those pro bombing Labour MPs have gone.

While 10 of them lost their seats in last week’s General Election, the other 27 left Labour for other opportunities either in business or as members of centrist neo-liberal parties.

The full list is:

  1. Adrian Bailey (West Bromwich West) STOOD DOWN AS MP IN 2019
  2. Alan Campbell (Tynemouth)
  3. Alan Johnson (Kingston upon Hull West & Hessle) STOOD DOWN AS MP IN 2017
  4. Alison McGovern (Wirral South)
  5. Angela Eagle (Wallasey)
  6. Angela Smith (Penistone and Stocksbridge) LEFT FOR TIG
  7. Anna Turley (Redcar) LOST SEAT IN 2019
  8. Ann Coffey (Stockport) LEFT FOR CHANGE UK
  9. Ben Bradshaw (Exeter)
  10. Bridget Phillipson (Houghton & Sunderland South)
  11. Caroline Flint (Don Valley) LOST SEAT IN 2019
  12. Colleen Fletcher (Coventry North East)
  13. Chris Bryant (Rhondda)
  14. Chris Leslie (Nottingham East) LEFT FOR TIG
  15. Chuka Umunna (Streatham) LEFT FOR TIG
  16. Conor McGinn (St Helens North)
  17. Dan Jarvis (Barnsley Central)
  18. Emma Reynolds (Wolverhampton North East) LOST SEAT IN 2019
  19. Frank Field (Birkenhead) LEFT TO BE INDEPENDENT
  20. Gareth Thomas (Harrow West)
  21. Gisela Stuart (Birmingham, Edgbaston) STOOD DOWN AS MP IN 2017
  22. Gloria De Piero (Ashfield) STOOD DOWN AS MP IN 2019
  23. George Howarth (Knowsley)
  24. Geoffrey Robinson (Coventry North West) STOOD DOWN AS MP IN 2019
  25. Graham Jones (Hyndburn) LOST SEAT IN 2019
  26. Harriet Harman (Camberwell & Peckham)
  27. Heidi Alexander (Lewisham East) STOOD DOWN AS MP IN 2018
  28. Helen Jones (Warrington North) STOOD DOWN AS MP IN 2019
  29. Hilary Benn (Leeds Central)
  30. Holly Lynch (Halifax)
  31. Ian Austin (Dudley North) LEFT TO TAKE UP JOB WITH THE TORIES
  32. Jamie Reed (Copeland) STOOD DOWN AS MP IN 2017
  33. Jenny Chapman (Darlington) LOST SEAT IN 2019
  34. Jim Dowd (Lewisham West) STOOD DOWN AS MP IN 2017
  35. Jim Fitzpatrick (Poplar & Limehouse) STOOD DOWN AS MP IN 2019
  36. Joan Ryan (Enfield North) LEFT FOR CHANGE UK
  37. John Spellar (Warley)
  38. John Woodcock (Barrow and Furness) STOOD DOWN AS MP IN 2019
  39. Keith Vaz (Leicester East) STOOD DOWN AS MP IN 2019
  40. Kevan Jones (North Durham)
  41. Kevin Barron (Rother Valley) STOOD DOWN AS MP IN 2019
  42. Liz Kendall (Leicester West)
  43. Louise Ellman (Liverpool Riverside) LEFT TO BE INDEPENDENT
  44. Luciana Berger (Liverpool Wavertree) LEFT FOR TIG
  45. Lucy Powell (Manchester Central)
  46. Margaret Beckett (Derby South)
  47. Margaret Hodge (Barking)
  48. Maria Eagle (Garston and Halewood)
  49. Mary Creagh (Wakefield) LOST SEAT IN 2019
  50. Michael Dugher (Barnsley East) STOOD DOWN AS MP IN 2017
  51. Neil Coyle (Bermondsey & Old Southwark)
  52. Pat McFadden (Wolverhampton South East)
  53. Peter Kyle (Hove)
  54. Phil Wilson (Sedgefield) LOST SEAT IN 2019
  55. Ruth Smeeth (Stoke on Trent North) LOST SEAT IN 2019
  56. Simon Danczuk (Rochdale) RESIGNED FROM LABOUR IN 2017
  57. Siobhain McDonagh (Mitcham and Morden)
  58. Stephen Doughty (Cardiff South and Penarth)
  59. Stella Creasy (Walthamstow)
  60. Susan Elan Jones (Clwyd South) LOST SEAT IN 2019
  61. Tom Blenkinsop (Middlesbrough South) STOOD DOWN AS MP IN 2017
  62. Tom Watson (West Bromwich East) STOOD DOWN AS MP IN 2019
  63. Tristram Hunt (Stoke-on-Trent Central) STOOD DOWN AS MP IN 2017
  64. Vernon Coaker (Gedling) LOST SEAT IN 2019
  65. Wayne David (Caerphilly)
  66. Yvette Cooper (Normanton, Pontefract and Castleford)

Towns called malice – the legacy of Thatcher

Darton blog

I WAS born into a middle class Tory voting household and to my eternal shame joined the Conservative Party at age 16.

I guess my father’s right wing doctrines influenced my own, and as a teenager and college student I followed those politics quite radically.

At 21 years old, against a left wing university backwash, I was Yorkshire vice-chairman of the Federation of Conservatives Students. I was a radical Tory, brushed shoulders with Michael Portillo, shared a whisky with former PM Ted Heath and fought hard in Thatcher’s election victory of 1979.

That remains the eternal shame of my youth.

But life is a great leveller and educator, and chalk face experiences over 38 years changed all that… it changed me as a person, socially, spiritually and politically.

In the year Thatcher was first elected, a more socially aware friend of mine warned: “There will be war in three years!”

How right she was!

In 1982 we were at war with Argentina over the Falkland Islands, ostensibly to liberate islanders loyal to the British Crown, but in reality because we had discovered huge reserves of oil in the South Atlantic a few years earlier.

And with Thatcher’s ratings in the opinion polls falling, there was a nothing like a bit of jingoism and nationalistic war fervour to boost Tory ratings.

But it was what I discovered years later as a newspaper journalist, which cast the Falklands War in a new light.

Not only was our prized battleship cruiser HMS Sheffield sunk while carrying nuclear depth charges, but against all international treaties to keep the South Atlantic nuclear free, Thatcher had deployed a British nuclear-armed submarine into the area.

The orders were clear: if the Argentines sunk another of our flagships, a pre-emptive nuclear strike on Cordoba was to be considered.

Just think for a minute where that might have led in 1982, at the height of the Cold War. Thatcher was prepared to risk a global Armageddon to secure her political ends.

But it was at home, where my opinions of Thatcher and her politics changed me forever.

My real education began in the early 1980s as a secondary school teacher in the South Yorkshire pit village of Darton – the home of Woolley Colliery, where NUM leader Arthur Scargill began his working life.

I lived in the village for four years among miners and their families, and many of my pupils were the sons and daughters of miners. Most of the boys were destined to become miners, and many of the girls would get jobs in businesses dependent on mining.

I played cricket each weekend with miners. My neighbours were miners. I went to football matches at Oakwell with miners. And I bought my first house from a miner.

The sound of the local pit hooter and the rattle of coal trucks woke me early each morning and the coal dust got into my clothes and my life.

But what struck me then, and has stayed with me ever since, was the sense of community and friendship which imbued every aspect of life in that village.

Life was vibrant!

If one of my charges misbehaved at school, I could be sure his or her parents would know about it, and he or she would be disciplined at home.

If I was ever ill in bed, a neighbour would knock at the door and ask if I needed any groceries or would leave a casserole of stew.

If the snow was deep we would all help clear each-others’ drives or pathways.

If anyone had a party in the street, the whole street would be invited, no exceptions. And those parties were real parties with Yorkshire beer, pies, gravy, chips and puddings.

And if my girlfriend had to walk home late at night, I wouldn’t fear for her safety.

It was a time of the greatest friendship and community I have ever known.

I moved away for misled career aspirations in 1983.

One year later, Thatcher’s brutal decision to crush the trade union movement at any cost, laid waste to this community and countless more like them.

They were never to recover.

For those not familiar with this time and place, watch the BBC TV boxed set Our Friends in the North to gain a little perspective.

All that was wonderful was lost forever due to capitalist greed and Thatcher’s need for unbridled power.

We had a nation divided against itself where the rich got richer while the rest fought for the scraps.

A whole street’s belief in Sunday’s roast beef

Gets dashed against the Co-op

To either cut down on beer or the kids new gear

It’s a big decision in a town called malice.

(Paul Weller)

My politics changed fast.

In 1988 I was in hospital in Cardiff undergoing surgery for a lung cancer.

It was a time of personal trauma, but also the making of new friendships.

Many of these friends were former miners from the South Wales valleys. Most were suffering from lung cancer due to a lifetime working among coal dust.

But it was their tales of how Thatcher crushed the miners’ strike that will always stay with me.

Some blamed Scargill for getting some of the NUM tactics wrong, but it was Thatcher they blamed for the decimation of their lives and families.

I learned how she used MI5 and the Met Police, and every dirty trick imaginable, to tarnish the personal reputations of the striking miners, even down to the conspiratorial murder of a taxi driver.

When I had fully recovered from the cancer in the mid-1990s, I travelled back to my old village near Barnsley to see how things had changed.

What met me was post-apocalyptic.

All vestiges of coal mining had gone, the shops had steel shutters on their windows, litter blew around the main street and pale youths gathered on corners with eyes that seemed devoid of hope.

The ghost of a steam train – echoes down my track

It’s at the moment bound for nowhere –

Just going round and round

Playground kids and creaking swings –

Lost laughter in the breeze

I could go on for hours and I probably will –

But I’d sooner put some joy back

In this town called malice.

(Paul Weller)

But time passes, and surely with two decades of government promises of better lives and Tony Blair’s “Things Can Only Get Better”, that despair I witnessed in 1997, must have changed.

So last weekend I returned to Darton once again, for the first time in 20 years.

In the distance the old pit heads have been replaced by rolling grassland, trees and green parkland.

To a passer-by it is picturesque… but this is nature’s illusion to mask the reality.

On the main A637 a small single business park is all that has replaced a mining industry that employed thousands in Barnsley alone.

And as I strolled round the decaying remains of the village and community I once loved, everywhere I looked brought tears to my eyes.

Long gone was Steve White the butchers, Broadheads the ironmongers, Henrietta’s dress shop, the local newsagents, the greengrocer and the launderette – a community meeting place for the miners’ wives.

Below uncleaned windows and blackened limestone walls they have been replaced with a Chinese takeaway, a tanning studio, an exotic pet store, a charity shop and boarded-up facades.

Cars and buses pass by quickly, rarely stopping on their way to somewhere else.

Only the elderly trundle along the pavement, past shops where there is nothing left to buy; walking small dogs and faces waxing grey and etched in lines of worry.

It reminded me of scenes I also witnessed in Northumberland (where my paternal grandfather and great grandfather were both miners) where three generations of families have been unemployed since 1984.

Their former pit communities have crumbled into decay, with all manner of social problems: derelict housing, rotting schools, drug dependency, street crime, high rates of teenage suicide and homelessness.

The villages remain, with three buses a day to their nearest towns and any chance of a better life, the lasting memory to Thatcher.

Thatcher’s true legacy lies in the coal dust of the communities she destroyed and the lasting fear of nuclear war.

And 38 years of Tory government (including Tony Blair’s New Labour Toryism) has ensured that the decay and legacy continues.

But the reality is there is an alternative.

That is the terrifying truth that the media, government and big business work so hard to conceal.

It the past two years, Jeremy Corbyn has woken us all to that truth and shown that alternative way forward… for the many and not the few.

  • No more forgotten communities
  • No more decay
  • No more unemployment
  • No more homelessness
  • No more scapegoating the poor
  • No more rough sleepers
  • No more fear of war

We can change the future for everyone on 8 June.

This is a journey we can all go on together, all of us. We can include everyone and fear no one.

I am voting Labour.

 

Trolls, bullies and stalkers incorporated

stalker

I HAVE been a published writer and hard-hitting investigative journalist for more than 30 years.

Over those years I have received letters of complaint and criticism when my words have struck a raw nerve – as a journalist it comes with the territory.

And it was always good to shine a light on the criticism and give the reader the right of reply.

But times have changed.

And technology now allows the trolls and stalkers to stay in the darkness.

I was active on the Telecom Gold internet in 1988 – long before the World Wide Web was born. Since the Millennium, I have been a member of almost every social media group imaginable, and for the past four years have written my own blog… the one you are reading now!

As a magazine and newspaper editor and writer, my name is well known; and if you search you will find me.

But internet trolls and weirdos have finally forced me underground – the anonymous keyboard filth who threaten, demean, bully, harass and follow.

Some 13 years ago, I had my first taste of these vermin through a football club website – one guy from Cardiff even threatened to drive 300 miles to “find” me! I laughed it off as football banter… at the time I knew no better.

Then four years ago the reality of these anonymous people hit home.

In May 2013, after I published my personal thoughts about the killers of Private Lee Rigby and the Islamophobia which followed his murder, I feared for my life.

Within an hour of my words hitting social media, I faced scores of threatening messages from far right Britain First and BNP extremists. Some had even hacked my Facebook account and downloaded photos of my children. More than a dozen people (including women) made death threats against me and my family, and one man threatened to find out which school my then 11 year-old son, attended… “it would be easy to find him,” he taunted.

So I closed down all my social media accounts, and by lucky coincidence we moved house and area two weeks later!

In the meantime I suffered a nervous breakdown.

I promised to take extra care with my social media activity in the future and re-entered the world of the internet in September 2013, when I began this blog.

So I wrote, campaigned, exposed and wrote some more.

Then it all came back with a vengeance early in 2016, while I was campaigning for the liberation of Palestine… and this time it was sinister and at the same time disgusting.

Over a number of weeks I was being trolled by Zionist Israelis with private messages and public postings of the most vile paedophile and sexual nature I will not repeat.

I managed to find out the identities of two of these trolls (one 35 year-old man and a 22 year-old woman) both based in Tel Aviv.

I reacted by publicly naming them, blocking them and withdrawing from some social media sites.

Although I must state here, that Facebook was toothless in dealing with these twisted bullies and perverts.

Over the ensuing 15 months I still fell victim to the occasional troll, but I had learned how to deal with them.

How wrong I was!

Three weeks ago, I began a daily writing campaign, through this blog, to support Jeremy Corbyn and the Labour Party.

My posts were being widely read (one had over 25,000 hits) and shared via Facebook, Twitter and other means.

And I received the occasional disagreeable comment from some readers.

But then it happened…

Three individual weirdos managed to find out my phone number (which is ex-directory) via Facebook and my other social media activity and the calls and text messages began.

I am still hanging up my phone and deleting texts as I write this.

It doesn’t frighten me, but some things in life are more important.

I will always stay true to my political beliefs, which are ingrained deep within me, and will continue to write my blog.

But today, I deleted my Facebook account – which I have maintained for 10 years – and am clearing my social media footprint.

I have had enough!

I am a writer AND a fighter, but family, peace, music and love are much more important.

 

Manifesto: the General Election choice is simple

Choice blog

NEXT month’s General Election is a pivotal moment and will change our country for a generation and beyond.

The choice is simple.

We have the “strong and unstable” Tories who are hell bent on turning our country into a Little Britain for the powerful and rich and let the devil take the hindmost for the rest of us.

Or we have a Jeremy Corbyn led Labour government dedicated to serving and helping the “many and not the few”.

If we, the electorate make the wrong choice, I fear deeply for our collective futures.

For decades our country has been sleep walking into a world of personal greed, arrogance and self-importance with totems such as million pound homes, winner takes all, designer clothes labels and reverence to the aristocracy.

Human kindness, gentleness, peace, society and social justice were jettisoned for a winner takes all mentality and a scapegoating of the homeless, those claiming benefits, the disabled, Muslims, asylum seekers and the poor in general.

Once again, the choice is simple.

We must not again elect a UK government compiled of self-seeking rich Tory elitists who care more about their mansions and banking friends than about people.

And their shopping list for change is truly terrifying.

Over the next few years an unshackled Theresa May Conservative government will:

  • Bungle a Hard Brexit in which we will lose all the social and economic benefits and safeguards we have collectively fought so hard to preserve for the past 45 years.
  • Rip up the Human Rights Act, which underpins our legal system and protects all our basic freedoms and those of persecuted minorities.
  • Spend £200billion on replacing Trident with new nuclear weapons, which at the push of a button could wipe out millions of lives and pollute our planet for tens of thousands of years.
  • Make £12.8billion of cuts to welfare, leaving the poorest, the oldest and the weakest in our society facing the bleakest of futures. In turn this will ensure the need for a food bank in every town and extend child poverty ensuring suffering and a loss of opportunity for millions.
  • Begin a phased end to council housing, thus pushing up rents in the private sector and making families homeless. Once again – as under Thatcher – we are already seeing a surge in rough sleeping and begging.
  • Will enact tougher sanctions on migrants and refugees whether from Europe or beyond.
  • Involve the UK in further illegal wars in the Middle East and trigger an increase in racism and Islamophobia.
  • Back a return of the barbaric blood sports of fox hunting and deer coursing.
  • Extend zero hours contracts, thus massaging the unemployment figures and leaving thousands of the poorest people without any job security.
  • Legislate for more private schools and academies which will imbed the class system even deeper in our society, rather focus on improving our state schooling system.
  • Escalate and accelerate the privatisation of the NHS, so medical care will depend on wealth and power rather than need.
  • Then redraw constituency boundaries so these same corrupt capitalist elitists stay in power for another 20 more years.

But under Jeremy Corbyn, Labour is offering a real and radical alternative which gives renewed hope of a better future.

Over the past two years this gentle political firebrand has packed out meetings and hustings the length and breadth of this country with his simple messages of fairness, compassion and change

His messages have caught the hearts and minds of millions.

Now those messages are wrapped up in Labour’s pledges for this General Election and will be spelt out fully in the party’s manifesto, which will be launched next week.

Jeremy Corbyn’s 10 Pledges to Rebuild and Transform Britain are quite simply breath-taking and wonderful:

  1. Full Employment – a publicly-owned National Investment Bank and regional banks will back up £500bn of investment across energy, transport and housing.
  2. A Secure Homes Guarantee – over a million new homes in five years will be built, with at least half a million council homes, through its public investment strategy.
  3. Security at work – people will have stronger employment rights “from day one in a job”, an end to “exploitative zero hours contracts”, repeal the Trade Union Act and the creation of new sectoral collective bargaining rights. Ensure that any employer wishing to recruit labour from abroad does not undercut workers at home – because it causes divisions when people are played off against each other.
  4. A secure NHS and social care – an end to any NHS services being outsourced to private health providers.
  5. A National Education Service – universal childcare to give all children a good start in life, allowing greater sharing of caring responsibilities and removing barriers to women participating in the labour market.
  6. Action to secure our environment – an expansion of green industries, using the National Investment Bank to invest in public and community-owned renewable energy.
  7. Put the public back into our economy – people will have “a real say in their local communities with increased local and regional democracy”.
  8. Cut inequality in income and wealth – the tax system will become “more progressive” so higher earners are “fairly taxed” and people on lower incomes will have their pay boosted through a higher minimum wage of £10 an hour.
  9. Action to secure an equal society – Labour will take action to tackle violence against women and girls, racism and discrimination on the basis of faith, and secure real equality for LGBT and disabled people.
  10. Peace and justice at the heart of foreign policy – human rights and social justice will be built into trade policy, while international treaty obligations on nuclear disarmament will be honoured as it encourages others to do the same.

A brave new world indeed, and those Corbyn led Labour pledges are forever true.

Fairness, compassion and equality can finally overturn the scourge of capitalist greed.

Hope is renewed.

The choice is simple: vote Labour.

 

Labour Party membership surges to new all-time high

Jezwecan

OUR perfectly balanced media <irony> keeps telling us that Labour under Jeremy Corbyn is unelectable and members are leaving the Party in droves.

Oh, how wrong they are!

New figures show party membership is creeping towards 660,000, with more than 50,000 joining since Theresa May called the General Election.

Two months ago our unbiased press <irony> were in celebratory mood, reporting that members were leaving the Labour Party in record numbers, and it was all because Jeremy Corbyn was so unpopular.

The Times, The Daily Telegraph, The Daily Mail and even The Guardian reported in March that 7,000 members had left after Mr Corbyn told MPs to back the Brexit bill

And Labour had lost nearly 26,000 members since last summer.

They claimed that the number of resignations in 2016 was more than the previous six years combined, while more than 15,465 had left since mid-December.

They further claimed that Labour membership was down to a new low at 517,000.

Yet they failed to note that in May 2015, after the last General Election, and before Jeremy Corbyn became Leader, membership was at a mere 200,000!

They also ignored Shadow Chancellor, John McDonnell, when he explained: “These figures are mostly seasonal or the result of the lapsing of members who joined last summer and were unable to vote in the leadership election.

“But Labour is now the largest party in Western Europe. And that is because people have joined Labour in record numbers under Jeremy Corbyn’s leadership, which is something other parties can only dream of matching.”

Now, some five weeks later, the silence on this subject by our fevered media is deafening.

Why?

Because the lie has been revealed.

New figures show the Labour Party boasting more than 650,000 members – the highest figure for 40 years.

Double the number of people have joined the Labour Party since the 2015 General Election than are members of the Conservatives.

By contrast, total Tory membership is around 150,000 people, according to the latest available figures, down from over 253,000 during the 2005 leadership contest.

So why aren’t the media reporting this?

Total Full Membership of the Labour Party is now over 490,000 – more than Tony Blair enjoyed at the 1997 election.

Add to this more than 160,000 Registered Supporters and Affiliated Members and the Labour Party now has a membership well in excess of 650,000.

This is the highest party membership figure since 1976.

The membership surge has allowed the party to pay off its £24.5 million debts and abandon its forced move out of Westminster.

Labour’s membership leap has been driven by a surge in joiners during and since the party’s leadership elections in 2015 and 2016.

And despite the dip earlier this year, people are turning to Labour again as the General Election campaign heats up, with 50,000 new membership applications in just three weeks.

The composition of the Labour Party is changing too.

The average age of the party membership fell by 11 years over the last nine months – from 53 to 42 – and more women than men joined.

Jeremy Corbyn hopes this mass membership will provide Labour with an edge over the Conservatives in the General Election.

His campaign team toyed with the idea of calling the membership drive “Make It a Million”, but discarded this on the grounds that it could turn into a hostage to fortune if they fail to reach that target.

This is a far cry from the dim days of 2006, when under Tony Blair’s leadership, warnings were made that Labour Party membership could disappear within seven years if the rate of decline at the time continued.

Jon Cruddas, MP for Dagenham and a former Downing Street aide, said in December 2006 that the party had lost 160,000 members between 2000 and 2006 – the equivalent of one every 20 minutes.

He warned Labour must rally members and re-engage with the electorate through community campaigning, saying: “You need to build it from the bottom up. Activity on the streets, a local presence, continuously, year on year and not just at election times.”

And as recently as February 2015 a similar warning was made that if electoral defeats and a loss of membership continued then Labour’s ‘core’ support would soon be reduced to London and several other big metropolitan areas.

Then, under Ed Miliband’s leadership, they were reduced to hoping that the lost voters would somehow return by May when faced with the prospect of another Tory government.

And of course the rest is history.

Now fast forward to May 2017 and more than 650,000 paid up members and supporters of Jeremy Corbyn’s Labour Party show that Labour’s new direction is more popular than anyone could have imagined.

It appears that the more the media spin against Mr Corbyn’s leadership, the more the general public react by becoming members.

“All the spin and bias has proved to be counterproductive because the more attacks on Jeremy, the more members we recruit,” added John McDonnell.

If the past two years has showed us anything, it is not to trust political pundits or the right wing media – and to believe that another world is possible.

 

No Frontiers / Sans Frontieres

no_frontiers_EG

Andy is a plumber

He works from dawn till dusk

Barrie is a banker

Money fuels his lust

Colin is a carer

Looking after his old mum

Derek is a beggar

Seeking food to fill his tum

No borders

No nations

No warfare

No way

 

Edward is a baron

In a mansion cold and grey

Freddy is a homophobe

But he is secretly gay

Gregory is a millionaire

Funding international genocide

Harry is his best friend

Knowing how he lied

No borders

No nations

No warfare

No way

 

Indira is a seamstress

Making dresses for the rich

Jakinda she sews trainers

One rupee for every stitch

Kondo was a warrior

But HIV has made him sick

Leandro he is starving

Earning a dollar for a trick

No borders

No nations

No warfare

No way

 

Mendel is a Rabbi

Living in the Promised Land

Noam is quite pleasant

Though no one sees his hand

Ovadia he buys weapons

For the IDF to fire

Pesach is an agent

With 40 guns to hire

No borders

No nations

No warfare

No way

 

Qasim is a builder

He works to earn some bread

Radi is an Iman

Saying prayers for the dead

Saha she smiles bravely

While burying her mum

Tasnim lost her legs

In the heat of the Gaza sun

No borders

No nations

No warfare

No way

 

Ursula is the Scottish wife

Of a paedophile parish priest

Vanora owns a town house

On a street in Inverleith

Willie wants independence

From the bastard English rule

Yolanda says he crazy

And a brainless Indy fool

No borders

No nations

No warfare

No way

 

While bombs rain down aplenty

On helpless Palestine

The yanks they start to blitz

The bloody ISIS line

The rulers keep us under

With lies and racial fear

They sip their Pimms and cocktails

And serve us promises and beer

No borders

No nations

No warfare

No way

 

Think again Boris – a song for our Islington Herbivore

SONG for jc BLOG

Go ahead and smear him because he makes you doubt

Because he has denied himself the things you can’t live without

Laugh at him behind his back just like the others do

Remind him of the knives behind him when he comes walking through

 

But he’s loved by all of us

Resent him to the bone

You got something better?

You’ve got a heart of stone

 

Stop your conversation when he passes on the stairs

Hope he falls upon himself, no-one really cares

Because he can’t be exploited by media moguls anymore

Because he can’t be bribed or bought by the things that you adore

 

But he’s loved by all of us

Resent him to the bone

You got something better?

You’ve got a heart of stone

 

When the whip that’s keeping you in line doesn’t make him jump

Say he’s hard-of-hearing, as ridiculous as Donald Trump

Say he’s out of step with reality as you try to test his nerve

Because he doesn’t pay no tribute to the Queen that you serve

 

But he’s loved by all of us

Resent him to the bone

You got something better?

You’ve got a heart of stone

 

Say that he’s a loser because he uses common sense

Because he doesn’t increase his worth at someone else’s expense

Because he’s not afraid of trying, he embraces others with a smile

Because he doesn’t threaten immigrants, say he’s got no style

 

But he’s loved by all of us

Resent him to the bone

You got something better?

You’ve got a heart of stone

 

You can laugh at austerity, you can play your nuclear games

You think that when you rest at last you’ll go back from where you came

But you’ve pocketed your bonuses and you’ve changed since the womb

What happened to the real you, you’ve been captured but by whom?

 

But he’s loved by all of us

Resent him to the bone

You got something better?

You’ve got a heart of stone

 

(with thanks to Bob Dylan for the song pattern)